Friday, August 1, 2014

Falling Short in Chase of History

February 23, 2011 by Brian Salmond  
Filed under Blog

Brian Salmond

Brian Salmond

The Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in Super Bowl XLV. With the loss, Steeler head coach Mike Tomlin came up short in his pursuit of history, becoming the only black head coach to win two championships. Not only would Tomlin have held that piece of history, but the 37-year old head coach nearly became the youngest coach to win two titles.

Always graceful in defeat Tomlin accepted the failure of his team with class, offering no excuses.

Tomlin speaking on MVP Aaron Rodgers and the success he had versus the Steelers number one ranked defense said, “He made plays. We didn’t get the turnovers. He showed his meddle and continued to stand in there and throw the football and throw it accurately. I tip my hat to him for that.”

The reason I choose to speak on Tomlin is that when the NFL speaks about the best coaches in the league, rarely is Tomlin’s name mentioned along with New Orleans’ Sean Payton, Rex Ryan of the Jets, or even Andy Reid of the Philadelphia Eagles. Two of them have been coaching longer than Tomlin, and all have the same number of Super Bowl wins and appearances as Tomlin … combined. Not bad for a “brotha” that never played a down in the NFL, and is still working for the first NFL team that gave him a shot at being the HMIC, the Head Man in Charge, of a the NFL franchise with the most Super Bowl wins and tied for the most appearances.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Comments

One Response to “Falling Short in Chase of History”
  1. Through comments on blogs or weblogs, teachers can share their classroom experiences. Her articles held a reader’s interest.”

    Report this comment

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

Comment moderation is in use. Please do not submit your comment twice -- it will appear shortly.