Spiritual Verse – June 2017

Date posted: June 11, 2017

Know this, my beloved brothers; let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger. For the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God. Therefore put away all filthiness and rampant wickedness and receive with meekness the implanted word, which is able to save your souls.

But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. For if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man who looks intently at his natural face in a mirror. For he looks at himself and goes away and at once forgets what he was like. But the one who looks into the perfect law, the law of liberty, and perseveres, being no hearer who forgets but a doer who acts, he will be blessed in his doing.

If anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this person’s religion is worthless. Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.

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Under the Glittering Lights: Daddy’s Home

Date posted:

For the first time ever, Puff Daddy turned on Light — leading thousands of Saturday night partygoers at a pre- Billboard Awards celebration hosted at the Las Vegas hotspot.

The hip-hop mogul arrived with his son Justin and entourage in tow, and was greeted with a Ciroc bottle parade as soon as he took the stage. He then transformed the club into an impromptu birthday party for the late Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace — delighting the crowd by leading a “Happy Birthday” chorus and showing off his signature dance moves as the DJ spun Biggie hits like “Juicy” and “Hypnotize” well into the early morning.

Puff Daddy posses on red carpet at the Light Nightclub

Puff Daddy

The Light nightclub crowd enjoys Puff Daddy

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Let’s Talk

Date posted:

Eva Martin

Eva Martin on conflict resolution and the art of finding common ground

The act of resolving conflict is extraordinarily complex. It calls for people with strong disagreements to put their hearts, minds, and souls into reaching the ultimate goal: a positive outcome for both sides.

Compassion and empathy are the foundation of conflict resolution — because we are all human, and have the same core values and desires: peace, love and happiness. But outside forces may sometimes disrupt the journey toward those ideals, which often gives rise to conflict and the need for negotiation.

As with all things that call for us to look outside ourselves, the first step in resolving conflict is listening. Honest and open dialogue makes all sides feel at ease — and helps everyone accept a result that settles a conflict, understand why a disagreement existed in the first place, and avoid repeating mistakes that tear people apart.

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PEACE: Dear Fathers …

Date posted:

Fathers are so important — those men who take us further with education, exposure, support, protection and many other wonderful attributes that earn the title of “daddy.” The celebration of Father’s Day is for those daddies who offer that wonderful shoulder to lie your head on, and who offer encouraging words that keep you focused in a challenging world.

Yes, there is peace in a father’s love. The kind of love that is unconditional and forever. Love that can still be felt from those fathers who have passed on. It can be found in the silent moments of your mind. The loving memories of the times spent with your father that impact you the most and propel you toward positivity.

The child will always remember the moments spent with their fathers. And fathers who take on the challenge of guiding with the light of love? They will spark the leadership development that is necessary for success.

The love of a father toward a mother serves as the first glimpse of a child’s love for themselves. Knowing how one should be loved — and how to love in return — is shown within the household.

Peace is found in a father’s heart. The praying father will be given a peace that silences the world of confusion and clears the path for the wonders of life for his children. Let’s have a thankful heart for all fathers who guide with the light of love.

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Proof positive of America’s sad mental state

Date posted:

BY LOUIE OVERSTREET

Louie Overstreet

One doesn’t have to look any further than the current occupant of the White House for insight into the mental state of our country.

Enough uninformed voters in traditionally blue states put him in the White House. President Obama saved the auto industry, and the thanks he received from Michigan voters was a stab in the back by some obviously ungrateful voters.

I am personally embarrassed to have a person serving as President of the United States whose mental stability is, at best, highly suspect. His budget priorities demonstrate that he is Head Potentate of the Society of Science Deniers. He is proposing major reductions in — and in some cases, outright elimination of — programs that advance scientific knowledge or provide a safety net for people who have fallen on hard times.

Additionally, in a society that grows more uncaring and fearful with each passing day, prisons have become socially acceptable warehouses for non-violent people suffering from drug addiction and untreated mental illness. Another contributing factor is the hypocrisy of anti-abortion zealots. They argue endlessly about when life begins, but are not at all concerned for the well-being of infants and preschool children who, if provided an equal start in life, would have every opportunity to thrive.

It is frightening to watch the lack of civility exhibited by people serving in Congress as examples of how we should conduct our affairs on a daily basis in what should be a just, fair, and orderly society.

As to my mental state through it all, a favorite country singer of mine, the late Waylon Jennings summed it up well: “I have always been different with one foot over the line, Winding up somewhere one step ahead or behind, It ain’t been so easy, but I guess I shouldn’t complain, I have always been crazy, but it has kept me from going insane!”

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Pushing for excellence, from beginning to end

Date posted:

Capucine Holmes

BY CAPUCINE HOLMES

Education is the foundation of a healthy, sustainable community — and the people of Las Vegas understand that it takes an all-hands-on-deck effort to lift our young people toward their dreams.

One organization that embraces this collaborative approach is Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., better known as the AKAs. Established in 1908 on the campus of Howard University, the sorority is the force behind several programs that focus on serving young people and guiding them to higher education.

The Las Vegas chapter of AKAs, under the leadership of president Dr. Celeste Hunter, have formed an incredible partnership with Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. to provide financial support to high school graduates who are ready for college. These two organizations recently held their scholarship breakfast at the Texas Station, themed “Alpha and Omega: The Beginning and End.” They are leveraging their funds to make a strong impact — striving to reward excellence, encourage young people to dream big, and leave a lasting legacy in the community they love.

AKA’s 2017 Scholarship Awards Recipients

The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity’s Uplift Foundation

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VETTE’S VEGAS VOICE: What Should Be The Multicultural Academic Standards For Nevada Students?

Date posted:

Yvette Williams

BY YVETTE WILLIAMS

We may likely agree that the history taught in our classrooms for hundreds of years has conveniently omitted the contributions of people of color. Mayor Mitch Landrieu of New Orleans said it best: “So for those self-appointed defenders of history… they are eerily silent on what amounts to this historical malfeasance, a lie by omission.”

We can no longer be afraid of our truth, which is marked by both tragedy and triumph. Many will recall that in 2015, the Nevada Legislature and Governor Sandoval recognized the importance of multicultural education with the passage of AB234. The law is clear:

“The standards for social studies must include multicultural education, including, without limitation, information relating to contributions made by men and women from various racial and ethnic backgrounds. The Council shall consult with members of the community who represent the racial and ethnic diversity of this State in developing such standards.”

Prior to being appointed by Sen. Aaron Ford to the Nevada Council to Establish Academic Standards, I was honored to serve on the multicultural advisory committee working on these new standards. A final draft will be presented to the Council for final approval on June 20, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. (NDOE, 9890 Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas) and I strongly encourage those interested in multicultural education to participate in this meeting and add your comments. The public can find the draft at http://www.doe.nv.gov/Standards_Instructional_Support/Nevada_Academic_Standards/SocialStudies/ or www.CCBlackCaucus.com.

When reviewing the draft, it’s important to note that NDOE will issue an Implementation Guide that will offer curriculum suggestions for school districts. It’s long overdue that we integrate social studies taught in classrooms occupied by diverse students of color. This is about our future, and an opportunity to tell our stories.

Yvette Williams is a community advocate and Chair/Founder of the Clark County Black Caucus, a non-partisan community organization driven 100% by volunteer members registered to vote. Follow her Blog at www.YvetteBWilliams.com and on twitter @YvetteBWilliams or contact her at ClarkCountyBlackCaucus@gmail.com for more information.

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HEALTHIER YOU: On the (Belly) Button

Date posted:

BY DR. ANNETTE MAYES, OB/GYN

DR. ANNETTE MAYE

June is Hernia Awareness Month and many new parents are discovering that umbilical hernias are fairly common among infants. They are typically caused when the umbilical cord passes through an opening in the baby’s abdominal muscles during pregnancy. The opening usually closes right after birth. If it doesn’t close all the way, a weak spot can develop in the baby’s abdominal wall, making them more susceptible to an umbilical hernia.

When an umbilical hernia develops at birth, it may push the belly button out. Umbilical hernias in newborns will almost always heal without surgery. However, your doctor may recommend surgery if:

Umbilical hernias in adults may occur as a result of:

They’re most common among adults who are overweight and women who were recently pregnant. Women who have had multiple pregnancies are at even greater risk for umbilical hernias.

Umbilical hernias in adults are less likely to go away on their own. They usually grow larger over time and often require surgical repair. Umbilical hernia surgery is performed in two different ways: open hernia repair and laparoscope hernia repair. During a conventional open hernia repair, the surgeon makes an incision below our belly button to access the hernia.

Laparoscopic hernia repair is the less invasive procedure. The surgeon makes several smaller incisions around the hernia site. They’ll insert a thin, flexible tube with a light on the end into one of the incisions. This instrument is called a laparoscope. It allows the surgeon to see inside your abdominal cavity on a video screen.

Regardless of the type of surgery, the procedure is the same. The surgeon will gently push the bulging intestine and abdominal lining back through the hole in the abdominal wall. Then they’ll sew the hole closed. Sometimes they’ll insert a synthetic mesh material into the abdomen to strengthen the area.

For additional information, contact the Las Vegas All Women’s Care Offices at (702) 522-9640. Or visit us at 700 Shadow Lane No. 165 (1st floor) in Las Vegas.

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WELL WOMEN OF COLOR | Rosalind Brooks

Date posted:

Drop by Drop: How fat enters your body

When you eat food that contains fat, it goes through your stomach and intestines. Large fat droplets get broken down into even smaller droplets, increasing the fat’s surface area. The fat, thru a series of chemical reactions in the gall bladder, pancreas and intestinal lining, is released into the lymphatic system.

From there, they do not go directly into the bloodstream because they’re too big to pass through. The lymphatic system eventually merges with the veins, at which point the fat passes into the bloodstream. The fat is then absorbed from the blood into the fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin directs fatty acids turning them into fat molecules and stored as fat droplets. One droplet per one fat cell.

As your body breaks down fat, the number of fat cells remain the same; each fat cell simply gets smaller. Your weight is determined by the rate at which you store energy (fat) from the food that you eat, and the rate at which you use that energy.

All sugars with an -ose — fructose, sucrose, lactose — are called “simple sugars,” and can be found on labels under the carbohydrate section labeled “sugar.”

Complex carbs are known as “starches.” Most grains (wheat, corn, oats, rice) and things like potatoes and plantains are high in starch.

It takes a lot longer to break down a starch. Example: in a can of soda, glucose enters the bloodstream at a rate of 30 calories a minute, but a complex carb is digested more slowly, so glucose enters the bloodstream at a rate of only 2 calories a minute.

These are the basics of how fat and sugar is used by the body. Bottom line — eat more whole foods, not packaged foods.

Got questions? Send an e-mail to roz@wellwomenofcolor.com

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‘Make sure people have what they need’

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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS | ERIC J. WILLIAMS

The first man to serve as president of the National Black Nurses Association opens up about the impact of his profession.

Eric J. Williams

Nearly a half-century after its founding, the National Black Nurses Association has the first male president in its history. Eric J. Williams is the leader of the 150,000-member group organized in 1971 under the leadership of Dr. Lauranne Sams, former dean of the School of Nursing at Tuskegee University.

Members of the non-profit organization will convene at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on July 30-August 4 for the NBNA’s 45th Annual Institute and Conference, themed “Nursing Innovations: Building a Healthy Community.” Williams, who holds a doctorate in nursing, sat down with Las Vegas Black Image to talk about the conference and the state of his profession.

What inspired you to join the NBNA, and how does it feel to be the first male president?

I joined the organization in 1984 as a student at William Carey University in Hattiesburg, Mississippi — and became more aggressively involved in 1992. I have served on the board of directors on two different occasions, I’ve been 2nd Vice President for four years and 1st Vice President for the organization for three years. I have also worked as local president of the New Orleans Black Nurses Association and the Council of Black Nurses in Los Angeles. It has been very rewarding to be president of the NBNA. Under my tenure, we have created new programs, and my role as a trailblazer in the organization illustrates that men can lead an organization that is perceived as gender-specific. Men in nursing are making a difference, and I’m showing that we can lead an organization like NBNA and inform health care policies. Under my leadership, we have worked on violence reduction and mentoring programs to create the next generation of leaders.

Do you see more of an interest in nursing by young African American males?

We need to work more in that area, to educate them that nursing is a viable career. There are over 300 roles that one can do as a registered nurse — whether as a registered nurse, entrepreneur, anesthetist, educator, or administrator. I entered nursing school right after high school and received my bachelor’s degree.

What is the NBNA agenda on health care for black people?

We are still working to assure access to health care, to make sure that people have what they need for preventive care — and making sure that people experiencing socioeconomic challenges, such as poor housing, are able to receive the health care they need. We need to make our legislators accountable when it comes to health care and any changes proposed by the new administration in the White House.

What are you excited about with the upcoming NBNA conference in Las Vegas?

All of the scheduled workshops are very important. There will be an opening session free to the public, and there will also be a day that our exhibit hall will be free and open to the general public.

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