Southern Nevada Regional Housing Authority

Date posted: March 11, 2020

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Direct Connect Job Listings – November 2019

Date posted: November 12, 2019

Direct Connect Job Listings – November 2019

BY LAUREN ANDERSON

LAUREN ANDERSON

Do you know the major employers in Las Vegas? As of 2018, the top industries leading economic growth include leisure and hospitality, government trade/transportation/utilities, business services, education, and health services

All-In Recruiting & Talent Boutique offers recruitment solutions to employers seeking top talent and diverse professionals. We make companies better by delivering exceptional results, specializing in direct placement, executive search, and temporary/contract placement technology fields.

We make job candidates happy by providing solutions for success, including resume services, professional branding, job listings, and an outstanding candidate experience at All-inrecruiting.com Here’s a public listing of openings for job-seekers in Nevada:

Field Compensation Advisors
All-In Recruiting – Microsoft
www.all-inrecruiting.com

Utilization & Case Management Nurse
All-In Recruiting – LA FFD
www.all-inrecruiting.com

Claims Adjuster Trainee
Progressive
https://www.progressive.com

Client Advisor – FT & PT
Louis Vuitton
https://us.louisvuitton.com

Court Recorder/Transcriber
Clark County
www.clarkcountynv.gov

Design Consultant
Bassett Furniture
https://www.bassettfurniture.com

Analyst I/II/III – Customer Engagement
Southwest Gas
https://www.swgas.com/

Data Center Technician
Google
https://careers.google.com

HR Contact Center Agent
Amazon.com Services Inc
https://www.amazon.jobs

Package Handler- Part Time
United Parcel Service
https://www.jobs-ups.com

Lauren Anderson, MS Owner of All-In Recruiting & Talent Boutique LLC Connect with me on LinkedIN: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/allinrecruiting/

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Southern Nevada Regional Housing Authority

Date posted:

procurement@snvrha.org

ha.economicengine.com

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Black Image Community Billboard – November 2019

Date posted:

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50 Shades Of Black: A Fictitious Exotic Journey For “The Best Part”

Date posted:

Do you feel me?

Zena connects with a friend and tries to sort out her feelings for Maximus.

After all she’s been through with Maximus lately, Zena needs some time with a good friend. Her longtime girlfriend, Val, is just what the doctor ordered.

So much to talk about. I keep reminding myself to not tell her all my business, but I feel a need to share because the last couple of weeks with Maximus have been amazing but also confusing.

Zena walks into a popular restaurant, Zone, and is seated at a table that looks out onto a busy downtown Atlanta street. Val is a little late, so Zena glances at her phone to see if she received a text.

Zena sends a message: “Where are you? I’m here.”

Val replies: “I’m around the corner. Almost there.”

She is always late, but it will be nice to have some girlfriend time.

Val walks up behind Zena’s chair and startles her with a whisper in her ear mimicking a Barry White voice: “Hey baby, what’choo doing?” Zena quickly turns in surprise.

“Girl, you are so crazy.”

“No I think you are crazy. Why you so jumpy? You think I was HIM?”

“No…who’s HIM?”

“Well, something is going on and I haven’t heard from you in weeks. So what’s going on?”

“Let’s order our food, because you’re always late.”

“That’s not what people say. I get just the opposite. My good-good says, ‘Baby you are always on time.’ Now, what’s been going on? How’s the new job?”

“Okay Val, I can only answer one question at a time.”

“Girl, I am waiting — what is the tea? You have a glow-flow girl. Just tell me about THAT.”

Zena leans forward to Val on the opposite side of the table, and starts spilling the thoughts in her head, in a stream of consciousness.

Well, I have been seeing someone and it has been a crazy time. But a very good time as well. It’s hard to really explain. He is like that favorite dessert that you have when nobody is looking. He makes me feel something I have never felt before, like I am being introduced to my sensual self for the very first time. He hasn’t said that we are exclusive yet, but he takes up so much space in my mind each day from when I wake up to when I go to sleep. I can’t explain what it is. His kisses penetrate deeper to my soul than when we make love. But when he combines both, it’s like an atomic bomb that explodes going all the way down my thighs. Girl, he is HIM.

“Wow! Shut up! I have never had that before, but I know that kind of love might only happen once in a lifetime. So you just enjoy. You are not married and who knows what could happen. Is he successful? What does he do?”

Zena reluctantly speaks after taking a deep breath. “Yes, he is very successful — he owns the advertising firm I work at. But he is very professional and never initiates anything at work. He just shows up at the most unlikely places to show and give me love. I just can’t really explain it.”

“He’s not married is he?”

Another stream of consciousness.

No, I don’t think so. I have been to his townhome and there are no signs of a woman living there or in his life. It’s funny, but we really haven’t had conversations about anyone. He hasn’t asked me and I haven’t really had any conversations with him about other people in his life. It’s just about us when we are together. He gives me uninterrupted attention and care. I know it’s very different, but I think I am ready for different. I did see him at a coffee shop with another woman, and I can’t lie — I was really bothered by it. But I haven’t asked him directly about who the woman was, because the next day after that he showed UP.

“What? What are you talking about?”

Zena has been waiting to tell the story.

Girl, he always shows up when I am in my head thinking about him the most. It was crazy. I had just finished yoga and I was all sweaty, but so relaxed. It was really late at the health club and no one was really there but me … I thought. I was taking a shower and somehow he came inside the shower and started massaging me. I mean all of me with a warm oil and whispering to me how beautiful my skin was and kissing me everywhere. His soft lips kissing me all the way down my back done down to my ankles. It was so erotic. He slowly turned me around to face him, rubbed my hair, caressed my face, and told me to go get dressed and meet him in the lobby because he had a surprise for me. That night was magical.

Zena looks at her phone to see the time and abruptly stops the conversation.

“What time is it? Val, I have to go — I am so sorry. I forgot I have a meeting a have to get to. But I will call you later.”

“Okay, Zena. You better call me, girl.”

“I will.”

Early Saturday morning Zena goes on her morning jog at the park down the block from her apartment. She receives a text form Maximus. Zena smiles as she reads it.

“Where are you? I need you now.”

“I am on my jog. What’s wrong?”

“Nothing is wrong. Everything is right. I just want us to connect right now — spiritually.”

Zena smiles with curiosity and continues to read texts from Maximus.

“Do you feel me?”

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UNLV School of Medicine Student Determined to Help the Underserved

Date posted:

UNLV School of Medicine Student Determined to Help the Underserved

BY PAUL HARASIM

Sami Mesgun

Every time Sami Mesgun, a first-year UNLV School of Medicine student, thinks about the experience of his family, it seems more like a miracle.

When you hear his story, you can’t help but remember the inscription on the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”

It is an American Dream story — where hard work pays off, where the child of poor immigrants pledges to give better healthcare back to the country that kept hope alive for his family, where dreams of leaving grinding poverty behind still can come true.

Mesgun’s parents grew up in Eritrea, which won a 30-year war of independence from Ethiopia in 1991. They didn’t escape the warfare together, first meeting in the nearby country of Sudan, where they eventually — after overcoming some harrowing hostility toward refugees — received the physical and legal protections that allowed them to come to the United States from Africa.

“Out of fear for their lives, they fled, hiding during the day and trekking at night,” he said. “My dad, in his twenties, abandoned his livelihood of selling chickens … my mom was only a teenager.”

Sami’s mom and dad eventually made it to the U.S. and settled in Las Vegas. Sami attended Durango High School and earned a scholarship to Cornell University. His brother is now attending UNLV and his sister is at Durango.

“I still find it miraculous that my dad was able to be the family’s sole provider as a taxi driver,” says Mesgun, who notes that after his father drove a taxi 12 hours a day for 10 years, the family was able to move from a two-bedroom apartment, with his dad purchasing a three-bedroom house.

Sami Mesgun and family

Mesgun is grateful that his parents stressed education as a way to a better life.

“When I was younger, my mother bought me English workbooks to work on grammar on the weekends even though she had difficulty with the language,” he recalled. “She made me give the workbooks to the teacher on Monday to make sure I did them right.”

If Mesgun wasn’t studying, he was running track and cross country for Durango High School, becoming captain of the cross country team his senior year.

It was while he was in middle and high school that he started thinking about becoming a physician. He would accompany his dad to medical appointments — and noticed that his dad never felt comfortable until a doctor took the time to understand his cultural beliefs regarding health (God’s will) and lay out his presentation of health problems in a way that made more sense to him.

Mesgun said he hopes to be much like the physician that his father appreciated. One who takes the time, for example, to find out that in his patient’s culture, God, not a medical practitioner, had the most to do with health outcomes.

Mesgun says when physicians took the time to patiently explain to his father how exercise and diet can help cardiovascular health, and how an enlarged prostate can affect well-being, Mesgun says his father came to realize that spirituality isn’t the only important element in healthcare.

“I want to be able to have conversations with patients that matter to them, where they fully disclose what’s going on with their health,” Mesgun says. “I want to help them manage their own health. I want to be about social justice and good medicine.”

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MOVIES IN BLACK

Date posted:

MOVIES IN BLACK

‘Slim’ chance you won’t be moved

Queen & Slim actors Jodie Turner-Smith and Daniel Kaluuya
(Photo credit: Campbell Addy/Universal Pictures)

“Queen & Slim” is an unflinching drama centering on an unforgettable first date between a black man (Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”) and a black woman (Jodie Turner-Smith) who are pulled over for a minor traffic infraction. The situation escalates, with sudden and tragic results, when the man kills the police officer in self-defense.

Terrified and in fear for their lives, the man, a retail employee, and the woman, a criminal defense lawyer, are forced to go on the run. But the incident is captured on video and goes viral — and the couple unwittingly become a symbol of trauma, terror, grief and pain for people across the country.

As they drive, these two unlikely fugitives will discover themselves and each other in the most dire and desperate of circumstances — and will forge a deep and powerful love that will reveal their shared humanity and shape the rest of their lives.

 

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FOOD FOR THE SOUL: Creole Turkey

Date posted:

 Creole Turkey

It’s that time of the year: people in kitchens across America are preparing for Thanksgiving dinner, and searching for a new twist on one dish that their families and friends find indispensable: the turkey.

My special recipe is sure to light up taste buds on the holiday. May the good things in life be yours in abundance — and stay with you all year long. Happy Thanksgiving!

Ingredients (makes four servings)

Directions

Cook time:

Thirteen minutes per pound at 375 degrees, so about three hours. For crispier turkey skin, increase oven temperature to 385 degrees for the last 10 minutes.

 

Learn more at www.realorganicchef.com. Contact R.O.C. Team Las Vegas at (702) 762-3278

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NUBIAN WELLNESS: The shifts are accelerating — get off the sidelines

Date posted:

Body, mind and spirit maintenance is my mental health recipe.

BY TIFFANY MAYES EHOLOR

Tiffany Mayes Eholor

We stand on the shoulders of the ancestors who came before us. Thank God they never gave up — despite the adversity they faced. Whenever I feel defeated, discouraged or enraged by the injustices of our world, I remember: Character is revealed through pressure. I remember nothing great is ever established alone. I remember that I am my family’s keeper — no matter the disagreements — because together we are stronger. I ask myself, what causes have I joined hands with locally, selflessly, in order to educate our youth for the future?

Allow me to share two local organizations that not only represent brilliant leading lights in the State of Nevada, but also reach far beyond our community for the development of unity, communication and business on a global scale.

The African Chamber of Commerce & Tourism (ACCAT) Las Vegas presented a beautiful weekend celebration with AfrikFest 2019 — bridging our local Las Vegas community to the global African community through business, culture and truth. As a native Nevadan, I have never witnessed our state so organized and galvanized and ready to partner forward with the continent of Africa. I am encouraged! As I attended the Trade and Business Summit on How to do Business with Africa, I felt like I was back in New York! The attendees at this summit were diverse, seasoned, traveled and successful in their businesses. I was elated to know that my fellow Las Vegas neighbors were equally ready to share and gain information from around the continent of Africa! Business is rapidly progressing in Africa, and it is time for Nevadans to be involved. I highly recommend reaching out to this chamber and engaging if you are at all interested in investing in Africa.

A Night of African Excellence Awards Gala 2019 was a showcase of diverse African dignitaries and philanthropists showing up from the continent of Africa to support one another for their accomplishments in their communities both in the United States and Africa. Having the honor of sitting in this room brought me back to the first time I was in Africa. The power of humility, perseverance, dignity and spirit inspires me to my core — and always reminds me of our history before American slavery. Mental health awareness is remembering where we came from, in order to understand what we are living to move toward.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) held its 2019 Freedom Fund Gala, themed, “The Change I Want to See Begins With Me.”

The NAACP was founded in 1909. Just imagine the transitional changes in leadership throughout the decades and generations, hold together this organization together on a global scale. The leadership team for NAACP Branch #1111 Las Vegas orchestrated the night of the gala, as they presented and acknowledged our local leaders. It inspired me to remember: we, as a people, together, are magically resilient. I looked across the crowd of leaders from the young up-and-coming community organizers trailblazing light for our youth, to the top government leaders representing us in D.C. — and spirit reminded me: we are all one. One is never greater than another; we are all specifically here to give our individual talents.

The shifts are accelerating; can you feel them? Take a deep breath and give thanks for your life. Now is the time to re-join hands and unite because the ride may be bumpy, but together we are stronger.

Locally, nationally and globally, I give eternal thanks to our leaders who have passed before us — for their courage to engage within systems and organizations that are not always perfect. I thank God for their resilience. All movements are in progress through process to empower. Standing on the sidelines and saying nothing at this time in history is only a setback for our future generations to come.

Let us continue to receive guidance from our ancestors that passed before us, to give us the courage to speak our truth today in Las Vegas. Let us hold one another accountable through the challenges and successes we face daily. Let us continue, for the sake of our children’s mental health.

The things you are passionate about are not random — they are your calling. Though I have shared a few things I am interested in, I call out to the youth to find what matters to you and show up locally to learn more. If it doesn’t yet exist, collaborate. You never know who you will inspire by sharing your story while inevitably inspiring yourself. Be the change you want to see. We are the leaders we’ve been looking for.

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HEALTHIER YOU: Understanding diabetes

Date posted:

Understanding diabetes

BY DR. ANNETTE MAYES, OB/GYN

DR. ANNETTE MAYE

November is American Diabetes Month, and it is important to understand how this sometimes fatal disease affects millions of people. More than two million African- Americans are estimated to have diabetes — a chronic disease with no cure. Nearly 6% of African-American men and 8% of African-American women have this disease. It disproportionately affects African-Americans at a rate nearly double that of white Americans, and diabetes death rates for African-Americans are 2.5 times higher than their white counterparts.

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that converts sugar, starches and other food into energy. There are three types of diabetes. Type 1 usually begins in childhood and the body does not make insulin. Type 2 is an adult onset diabetes in which the body is resistant to insulin. The third type is limited to pregnancy-gestational diabetes. While there is no known cause for diabetes, genetics and other factors, such as obesity and lack of exercise, appear to play a major part.

Gestational diabetes is a temporary form of the disease that develops during pregnancy. It usually goes away after childbirth — however, women with gestational diabetes are at an increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. This condition is 80% more frequent in black women than white women.

Doctors no longer discourage women with diabetes from becoming pregnant. The key to a healthy pregnancy for a woman with diabetes is tight blood glucose control before and during pregnancy. Because the early weeks in a pregnancy are so important, it is a good idea to be in a good blood glucose control three to six months before planning a pregnancy.

Symptoms of diabetes in Type 1 cases include frequent urination, unusual thirst, extreme hunger, unusual weight loss, extreme fatigue and irritability. Type 2 diabetes include: Any of the type 1 symptoms, frequent infections, blurred vision, cuts and or bruises that are slow to heal, tingling and numbness in hands and feet, recurring skin, gum or bladder infections.

Diabetes is hereditary, so it is important to know your family health history. If you suspect that you are having health conditions related to diabetes in any way, you should see your health care professional for an examination. Or you can call the Las Vegas All Women’s Care at (702) 522-9640, and visit us at 700 Shadow Lane #165 in Las Vegas.

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