HEALTHIER YOU: Women and diabetes

Date posted: November 16, 2020

Women and diabetes

BY DR. ANNETTE MAYES, OB/GYN

DR. ANNETTE MAYES

Women with diabetes have more to manage. They have to stay on track by checking their blood sugar more often, eating healthy and staying active.

Diabetes affects women differently. Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease (the most common diabetes complication) by about four times in women but only about two times in men, and women have worse outcomes after a heart attack. Women are also at higher risk of other diabetes-related complications such as blindness, kidney disease, and depression.

Not only is diabetes different for women, there are also racial and ethnic factors: African-American, Hispanic/Latina, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women are more likely to have diabetes than white women.

Many women will get a vaginal yeast infection at some point, but women with diabetes are at higher risk — especially if their blood sugar levels are high. More than 50% of women will get a urinary tract infection (UTI) in their lifetime, and your risk may be higher if you have diabetes. Causes include high blood sugar levels and poor circulation (which reduces your body’s ability to fight infections). Also, some women have bladders that don’t empty all the way because of diabetes, creating a perfect environment for bacteria to grow.

To prevent yeast infections and UTIs, keep your blood sugar levels as close to your target range as possible. Other ways to prevent UTI’s: drink lots of water, wear cotton underwear, and urinate often instead of waiting until your bladder is full.

Changes in hormone levels right before and during your period can make blood sugar levels hard to predict. You may also have longer or heavier periods, and food cravings can make managing diabetes harder. You may notice a pattern over time or you may find that every period is different.

Diabetes can lower your interest in sex and your ability to enjoy it. For some women, vaginal dryness can make intercourse uncomfortable or even painful. Causes can include nerve damage, reduced blood flow, medications, and hormonal changes — including those during pregnancy or menopause.

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar during pregnancy. It can develop in women who don’t already have diabetes. It affects 2% to 10% of pregnancies in the United States every year. Any woman can have gestational diabetes, but some are at higher risk — including those who are overweight or have obesity, are more than 25 years old, or have a family history of type 2 diabetes.

For more information, call Las Vegas All Women’s Care at (702) 522-9640. Or visit us at 700 Shadow Lane #165 in Las Vegas.

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HEALTH IS THE NEW HAPPY! Rest and relax!

Date posted:

Rest and relax!

BY TIFFANY McNEELY

Tiffany McNeely

I came home and could only make it to the couch. Unfolded laundry was piled on the other side of me and there were toys on the floor. As I called out for my daughter to get my wallet — so I could just order pizza — my mind was telling me to get up. But my body would not listen. I couldn’t even lift my legs!

Have you ever been so tired that your body just gave out? That was me after three hard weeks of working out, going through my day-to-day at work, keeping the normal routine at home, and trying to squeeze in an adult social life for my own peace of mind. Sometimes we are so focused on go-go-go that we forget that rest is very important for our health.

Many of us find it hard to rest because we’re perfectionists or fear failure (perhaps both), according to Kelly Vincent, PsyD, a registered psychological assistant who works with young adults, women, professionals and athletes in Lafayette, Calif. “Even though we may not recognize it as perfectionism,” she said, “at times we are desperately trying so hard to be perfect by doing, accomplishing, and achieving everything we set our minds to.”

I can say that as a woman I am always trying to do it all — because I have been conditioned to be strong no matter what. I find that when I skip resting and just doing nothing that I lose my mojo or that pep in my step. Once I finally give into rest I can snap back with more energy and clarity.

We should plan time for rest throughout the week, to ensure we are getting enough time to recharge. As a busy single mom, I have to plan ahead for my recharge time. Every three months I go on a weekend trip without my kids. It gives me time to do something without having to think or have anyone depending on me. No work phone calls. My kids give me that time without non-stop calls for things they may need. During the month I try to pick a few nights to go out and have my own free time. I also work out at least three times a week to focus on my physical and mental health.

Find a schedule that works for your family. Sit down for a conversation about how to carve out time for yourself. Sleep is also important and a great form of rest. Waking up later on a day off or taking a cat nap recharges us more than we think. Here are some ways that you can rest and clear your mind: Try getting a massage, taking a hot bath, doing yoga, meditating, listening to music without words, sunbathing, taking a peaceful walk, or reading. Don’t wait to rest and relax — you deserve it!

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Caring for those who served

Date posted:

Caring for those who served

By Cassandra Cotton, Nathan Adelson Hospice Community Outreach Manager

As Veterans Day approaches, we cannot forget those who have worn the nation’s uniform and whose journey of life is coming to a close. The older adult population is the most rapidly growing population in the United States, and veterans are no exception: 42% of veterans are age 65 and over and nearly 1.2 million veterans are at least 85 years-old.

Veterans can find their needs during end-of-life care complicated by recurrences of PTSD, the prior loss of comrades who understood their situation, and even the need for validation of their time of service.

We Honor Veterans is a program pioneered by the Veterans Association and hospices nationwide to provide specialized care to those who served and training for those caring for veterans at the end of their lives. Nathan Adelson Hospice recently achieved Level Five in the We Honor Veterans Program. By achieving this level, the hospice is recognized as an organization that actively works to increase access to hospice and palliative care for veterans in our community. Nathan Adelson Hospice will continue to provide veteran-centric education for staff and volunteers, identify patients with military experience, build professional and organizational capacity to provide care for veterans, and develop and strengthen partnerships with the VA and other veterans’ organizations.

“It is our honor to support local veterans who have valiantly served our country. In 2019 we had the privilege of serving over 1,000 veterans,” said Karen Rubel, President and CEO of Nathan Adelson Hospice. “Our organization remains committed to meeting the unique and varied needs of veterans residing in southern Nevada. No veteran should ever end the journey of life alone, afraid or in pain.”

Nathan Adelson Hospice addresses the unique health care needs of veterans, both physical and emotional, including the psychological toll of war and how it impacts their end-of-life journey. Our veteran patients are paired with volunteers who have also served their country and share a unique and honorable bond. In addition, Nathan Adelson Hospice also recognizes the military service of veterans with special pinning ceremonies and awards.

If you or a loved one is a veteran and have questions, call Nathan Adelson Hospice at (702) 733-0320.

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YOU! HAVE THE POWER | Dr. Ellen Brown

Date posted:

Twenty power moves for 2020

BY DR. ELLEN BROWN

DR. ELLEN BROWN

The only place from where we can take action on anything is where we are at that point in time. Even though the activity may be in the future, its planning process must occur as an action in real time. The cliché that comes to mind is, “Today is all we have; when tomorrow gets here, it’s today and when we look back it’s yesterday.”

Wherever you are today in your thinking, planning, or doing, what action can you take? Now is not the time to throw up your hands, shake your head, roll your eyes, and wait for someone’s next move. Our lives in this country will go on, with or without the baggage of the past 4 years. Some things will continue, others will not.

How will you prepare for the future? There’s no question: for many of us, 2020 has been the worst year of our lives, but we have made it through 10 months — even if hanging by a thread. Now is not the time to give up. Here are 20 power moves we can make to go forward “from where we are”:

Dr. Ellen Brown, an Affiliate Faculty member at Regis University, Denver, CO. writes on political topics that encourage interest, discussion, and action. Have a comment, question, or idea? Contact Dr. Brown at ebrown.nci@gmail.com

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Restoring the Soul of America

Date posted:

Restoring the Soul of America

Susan Rice has spent a lifetime fighting to defend and uphold the country’s values, and is standing strong for Joe Biden in his bid to become the 46th President of the United States.

BY KEVIN LIAO

Ambassador Susan Rice is a highly skilled and accomplished diplomat with a wealth of experience fighting for American values. As Ambassador to the United Nations and National Security Advisor to President Obama, she rep

Susan Rice
On Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, Friends of the LBJ Library hosted a discussion with Susan E. Rice, former National Security Advisor to President Barack Obama and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. | LBJ Library photo by Jay Godwin 11/20/2019

resented the best of America. She has strived to use public service as a channel for making the world, and our country, fairer and more just. Throughout her career, she has been a strong advocate for issues like mitigating climate change, reducing global poverty and promoting gender equality.

During the Obama Administration, Rice was one of the President’s most trusted advisors — and as UN Ambassador, was the first Black woman to represent the United States at the United Nations. In that role, she drew on her wealth of diplomatic experience championing human rights and democracy across the globe. In President Obama’s second term, she became the head of the President’s National Security Council, and oversaw the Administration’s national security and foreign policy agenda.

Ambassador Rice’s background in government and foreign affairs runs deep. She grew up in Washington, D.C., the daughter of an economics professor and an education policy scholar. After receiving an undergraduate degree in history from Stanford, Rice was awarded the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship and earned her Master’s degree and Ph.D in International Relations at Oxford University.

She worked as a foreign policy aide and consultant before becoming Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs in the Clinton Administration in 1997. At 32 years old, she was the youngest Assistant Secretary in our country’s history. As Assistant Secretary, she shaped American foreign policy for 48 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and managed over 5,000 foreign service employees stationed at over 40 embassies on the continent. It was during her Senate Foreign Relations Committee nomination hearing for that role when then-Senator Joe Biden vouched for her. Since then, Ambassador Rice has worked closely with Vice President Biden in a variety of roles — culminating as the Obama Administration’s National Security Advisor.

Throughout her decades-long career working in government, Ambassador Rice has promoted, both here and abroad, American values like equality and progress. She embodied those values through her hard work and perseverance. And it is those values that drove her to become a vocal advocate for change following four years of President Donald Trump. She believes Joe Biden should be president.

Throughout the campaign, Ambassador Rice has expressed dismay at President Trump’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and how he has repeatedly stoked the flames of racial division. Ambassador Rice has become outspoken in her support of the Vice President and her desire to see America led by someone who is competent and compassionate. Through hard work, she believes our country can recover from this challenging period. To Ambassador Rice, Joe Biden will be the President that will uphold the American values she has spent her career fighting to defend and uphold.

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Remembering Black Wall Street

Date posted:

Remembering Black Wall Street

Black Wall Street burns in 1921

Hundreds of Black Americans died during a violent race riot that took place in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921. And it happened in one of the largest, most prosperous Black communities in the United States: Black Wall Street. The riot ignited after a Black teen was falsely accused of assaulting a white woman and an armed white mob flooded the African-American district to loot and set homes, churches, and businesses on fire. When it was over, 35 square blocks of homes and businesses had been destroyed. A 2001 commission found that 168 people died in the violence, but other reports put the number as high as 300 with more than 800 wounded.

To date, a recent discovery of 11 bodies was made in Oklahoma City in an unmarked mass grave site at Tulsa cemetery, where investigators were searching for victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Before 1921, most of Tulsa’s 10,000 African-American residents lived in the vibrant Greenwood District with flourishing black-owned businesses, two newspapers, several churches, a hotel and library. Many referred to Greenwood as “Black Wall Street.”

Black Wall Street was a self-sufficient community where black people ran prominent businesses. It was a thriving community in which centers of cultural institutions, banks, theaters, churches, schools and houses set the blueprint for Black people to create healthy and vibrant neighborhoods.

Black Wall Street was destroyed during the 1921 race riot, but rebounded and rebuilt the community. However, the civil rights movement gave Black people the option to shop at stores once reserved for whites, which meant they spent less money in their community. Unfortunately the district of Greenwood declined in the late 1960s and 1970s as urban renewal projects transformed the inner city.

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It was all on the ballot | By Louie Overstreet

Date posted:

It was all on the ballot

BY LOUIE OVERSTREET

Louie Overstreet

Our nation will remain divided — but by the time many of you read this column, the election will be over. However, the filing of lawsuits (and heaven forbid, violence in the streets) will just be getting started.

In the November 2020 election, in addition to the usual assortment of crooked and not-so-crooked persons seeking elective office at the local, state, and national levels, several things were on the ballot — most notably, democracy itself.

Throughout our nation, persons were elected to local school boards with about as much of a chance of solving America’s educational crisis as the proverbial man in the moon.

At the state level, legislators and governors are so strapped for revenue they are between a rock and hard place — facing the dilemma of voting to raise taxes to meet state constitutional requirements to balance revenues with expenditures, yet exhibiting the craven desire to be reelected. They are scared “crapless”!

However, far and away the most serious question is who will serve as President and Vice President of the United States of America. All one has to do to validate my assertion that democracy was on the ballot is to observe the behavior of the current prevaricating president and the criminal conduct engaged in by a number of his appointees.

However, should you still doubt my assertion, then answer to yourself, the following questions:

If not, then I am sure your butts voted. Right?

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PEACE: Personality feeds the soul

Date posted:

Once, while I was listening to Oprah Winfrey, she dispensed one of the nuggets of wisdom that has placed her among the iconic voices of our time: “Use your personality to feed your soul.”

It is sage advice on how to connect to our true destiny. In our day-to-day search for meaning and direction toward success in those areas that we are passionate about, we sometimes forget about the gifts that have been refined throughout our life journey. Indeed, they shape the person we are today. Our lives are being constantly reshaped by experiences — and our personalities are enlightened and direct the path to reconnecting with our souls.

The key is to stay awakened to shifts that serve as direction and food for your soul. This is your yellow brick road toward a purposeful life — one that connects to humanity and the good in yourself and others. Your universal presence will be led with intention.

We must wake up each day with good intentions and love — always approaching life from a position of gratitude. Being open, not judgmental, as we embrace thankfulness for the opportunity to live another day. Peace is there, blanketed in love.

Each day is yours. Put the good of your personality to work and allow it to guide you toward the magnificence of your full potential. You can use your smile, heart, and mind to create what feels good in your soul. Your lifetime is a school that equips you with discernment to always maintain positivity.

“You are the master of your faith and the captain of your soul” — so choose wisely and never forget that you had the power all along. Use it!

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Cardi B’s 28th “Arabian Nights” themed birthday celebration

Date posted: October 22, 2020

Cardi B’s 28th “Arabian Nights” themed birthday celebration that took place over the weekend with her nearest and dearest at Vegas’ Area 51. Dose of Roses, Beverly Hills-based luxury floral lifestyle brand set the scene for Cardi’s celebration fit for a Libra with custom rose bouquets made up of 10K fuchsia, gold, pink and purple roses as the focal point of each table. A-listers like Meg Thee Stallion, Kylie Jenner, Teyana Taylor and the City Girls were there to party with Cardi and shower her with well wishes.

Additionally Dose of Roses gifted Cardi B custom birthday boxed “Love Rectangles” bouquets comprised of 800 roses upon arrival at her hotel.

 

Based in Beverly Hills, Dose of Roses is a luxury floral lifestyle brand with boxed rose arrangements that last up to 5 years. It’s no secret that Cardi is a lover of objects of grandeur, so Dose of Roses wanted to give her a birthday to remember with florals that embody a status and state of mind that only the 90210 can offer.

 

About Dose of Roses:
Dose of Roses is the world’s fastest-growing online floral boutique. Founded in 2019 in Beverly Hills by culture-shaping savants Julian Wilson and Joseph Ayoub, Dose of Roses offers personalized and customized luxury rose arrangements that last up to five years, making life’s moments worth celebrating last. Wilson (29) and Ayoub (25) may be young, but the pair has already made a name for themselves in the E-commerce world, paving the way for brands like Fashion Nova to rise to the forefront of fashion and culture. Dose of Roses gives the consumer an all-encompassing experience and a stellar product that is simply unmatched in the industry, with opulent offerings for every price point and occasion imaginable. Arrangements are made up of 1-300 flowers, with the choice of luxe materials and accents such as leather, suede, marble, 24K gold and other customizable creations with square, round or dome-shaped arrangements.

Cardi B – Dose of Roses.mov

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Survivors

Date posted: October 19, 2020

Survivors

The facts about breast cancer are clear: Black women die at an extraordinarily disproportionate rate, up to 40 percent more likely than their White counterparts.

Las Vegas Black Image Magazine is honored to speak to and celebrate many women in our city who are survivors of breast cancer. They are beating the odds and we asked them to capture their survival journey in a single word.

Oauja Walker – Fearless –

 

Bonnie Johnson – God –

 

Belinda Harris – Bold –

 

Arnetta Gardner – Faith –

 

Really Rhoda – Emotional –

 

Mrs. Alma J. Bennett-Evans – Self –

 

Natashia White – Warrior –

 

Diane Williams – Undefeated –

 

Mz. King – Holistic –

 

Sonia Richey – Believer –

 

Mercedes Warrick – Blessed! –

 

Terri Yates – Determination –

 

Glennetta Capers – Faith –

 

Wyonna Foger – Blessed –

 

Katrina Jessica Bell – Thriving –

 

Rhayne Thomas – Determined –

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