To the East

Date posted: September 6, 2018

The Mayes family decided to visit Asia as a gift for daughter Melanie, for her graduation from Duke University. She had long dreamed of visiting an elephant sanctuary in Thailand — and the trip grew into a journey that included Hong Kong and Singapore.

This collection of precious photographs shows how the Mayes family experienced a variety of cultures, cuisines, and beautiful sights in in Asia. Mom Annette Mayes summed up the experience: “Hong Kong was crowded and busy, Thailand was laid-back and relaxing, and Singapore was very sophisticated and high-tech. There was something wonderful about them all.”

Asian marketplace

Torrey Mayes pets an elephant in Thailand.

Hong Kong skyline

Dr. Annette Mayes enjoys the Asian culture.

Orlando Mayes and son Torrey enjoy scuba diving.

Mayes family enjoy their Asian summer vacation.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Under the Glittering Lights

Date posted:

‘Rock On’ with Vegas

Bubba Knight (of Gladys Knight and the Pips fame) recently hosted a star-studded release party for his new single, “Rock On (Vegas City)” at the University of Nevada Las Vegas’ Artemus Ham Hall. In light of the #VegasStrong movement, Knight had a vision to create a theme song — one that is upbeat, inspirational, and captures the spirit of a resilient community that attracts people from all over the world.

Bubba Knight and sons Merald Knight III and Craig Knight.

George Wallace, Bubba Knight (Gladys Knight & The Pips), and LaMonte McLemore (The 5th Dimension).

Al B. Sure and Bubba Knight.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

2ND ANNUAL BLACK WOMEN WHO ROCK

Date posted:

Rowena Trim: Nurse at Roseman University of Health Sciences. And member of Black Nurses Association.

 

Monique Gordon-Ellis Westfield: Founder, director of Toni’s House

Symmie Mitchell: Radio Personality and educator. Community leader and advocate.

Diane Fitzgerald Mayfield: Retired from American Airlines and community supporter.

Dr. Trina Wiggins: Pediatrician and Health and Fitness competitor.

Stacey Huddleston: City of Las Vegas employee.

Iris Moore: Cosmetologist and medical administrative assistant.

Chimini Branch: Songstress and performer.

Cheryl Hall McElroy: Community and church leader. Licensed hospital chaplain.

Angie Thompson: Radio, TV personality, producer and writer.

Brittany Soul: Songstress/writer and author. Performer and realtor. Brittany Soul serves and empowers the community around her by way of art, music, and other means of inspiration.

Andrea Woods: Bookkeeper, office manager at Fuso Nightclub. Community leader and youth advocate.

Deborah Harris: State Coordinator for Women’s March on Washington/Nevada.

Aaliyah Ratliff: Manicurist and works with young girls in the community with dance and drill team performances.

Mary Mitchell: Supervisor of Maintenance at Clark County School District and owner of LMJ Cafe.

Myrtle Coleman: Owner of In’De Ore Makeup and Beauty. Community supporter and advocate for mental health awareness.

Ariella Azmarellda Blu: Entertainer, songstress, founder and CEO of CedAriEntertainment LLC. Community supporter.

Aynalem Workneh, a legal immigrant from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, who brought her entire family to the United States. She is the founder and president of Angels of Las Vegas, owner of Paradise Event and Wellness Center, Community advocate for cancer survivors, angelsoflv.org.

Kasina Boone: Student Success Advocate and community liaison at Clark County School District.

Sheila Gradford: Owner and manufacturer of Loni M Designs. Community supporter.

Andrea Cameron: Qualifications Specialist

LaShawnda Gray: City Employee at the City of Las Vegas.

Jackie Brantley: Community leader who has given historical contributions as the first African American female to serve as an executive in public relations for a Las Vegas strip hotel. Author and community advocate.

Sheryl Thornton Burnham: President Raider Nation RedZone Booster Club; Sales Manager Red Rock Casino Resort & Spa; Director of Membership services NFL Alumni Las Vegas Chapter; Owner of DeSquared LV Events.

Ricca Grace McCarrell: Healogics Inc administrator and coordinator at Desert Springs Hospital.

Linda Abrams Bowie: Licensed CADC intern at Grand Desert Psychiatric; CEO and owner at ABL Enterprises. Director at Flourish Trauma and Behavior Centers.

Tiffany Mayes Eholor: Founder of Tribal Exchange bridging Africa to the United States through fashion, farming and fine arts.

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

50 Shades Of Black: A Fictitious Exotic Journey For “The Best Part”

Date posted:

Meet Zena and Maximus

One man, one woman, one destiny. Before they meet, take a journey into their inner dialogue.

ZENA

If one more person asks me how to spell my name, I am going to go off. Maybe he didn’t hear me. I don’t know why I always sit by people who want to have a conversation on the bus. “I SAID MY NAME IS ZENA. IT’S SPELLED Z-E-N-A!”

Maybe that was a little too loud (chuckle). Looking like my Uncle Ray. I guess that’s why I am talking to him. How many stops does this bus have to take? It’s so hot in here, I hope my hair doesn’t go back before my interview. Lord, these stockings are making matters worse — and I can’t wait to take them off. But they’re essential in holding me all together. I know I shouldn’t have eaten so late last night.

“Yes, I am sorry, what did you say? No this is not my stop — mine should be the next one. It was nice talking to you too.”

He was a nice man and he wasn’t trying to mack. Finally! I hate these shoes and I hope the light changes soon. One more block and I will go straight to the bathroom and get myself together.

“Thank you!” I must be looking good for doors to be held open for me. Still have to make that stop and wipe my face. “Yes, what floor is human resources? Okay, thank you.”

Wow, this is a nice elevator and some people seem to be smiling. “Yes, can you please push number 4?” I am here to see Mr. Spoon. Yes, I would like a bottle of water. Thank you.”

Forbes Magazine, Time Magazine, and Good Housekeeping. I know that is not potato salad. I should submit my mother’s potato salad recipe and let Good Housekeeping know how it’s really done. I should be called soon — my appointment was almost fifteen minutes ago. Should I ask what’s taking so long?

“Yes, I am right here.” Wow! This white man is fine, but I am going to keep it professional. So many questions. I hope he likes me. I just have to relax. My resume is on point, because my auntie helped me. I know he likes it. “Yes, I am ready for the opportunity to work for your company.” Entry level is good, just need to get this job. Should I ask about the pay? No, maybe not. Keep smiling. I hope I don’t have lipstick on my teeth. No, I’m straight.

“Do you know when I might hear back from you?” Now, this will tell me if he likes me or not. “Thank you for your time, Mr. Spoon. Okay, Greg.” She ready! (laughs)

I hope I can catch my bus. I might have to take these heels off to walk back to the bus stop. You almost hit me. He wasn’t even looking. Now, he is looking, huh.

MAXIMUS

I am always delayed for some reason. These crazy people better watch where they are going. Traffic is getting bad. If someone hits my new BMW I will be on the news.

I should have taken off my jacket before getting into my car. So hot today. My air conditioning is starting to kick in. Hey, don’t honk at me. Light changed so fast. I have to put my phone down, but I want to see if Ms. Beautiful Lips liked my recent post. I swear that sistah has the most beautiful lips. Like two plump strawberries. I wonder how they taste.

I did get a like when I posted my full name, Maximus. My mother hates it when people call me Max. I am so crazy, I don’t even know that lady…what if she’s not a SHE? (Laughter) Never know these days.

(SCREECH!) Where did she come from? Wow! She almost made me hit her. Why is she walking so fast with no shoes? But she is fine. I have been single for way too long. If I get off in time I will go to the gym. Yeah, I’m still looking. I like a sistah with a hustle. I wonder what side of town she is going to.

“Hey Shelly, any messages? I worked on the Powerpoint for the new ad campaign last night, and I know the client will love it. I think (laughs)? From your mouth to their ears. Yes, I have lost a few pounds. Staying in the gym and basketball on weekends helps. I try to get to the gym at least 4 times a week, but tonight it looks like a long one. Order a salad for lunch and I will eat at my desk.

“Thank you Shelly. You always take care of me. Who? Tell her I’m out. If she wasn’t a doctor I would try to find her one. Yes, this is why I am single. Call Dan Patrick and tell him we can meet next week to go over the new ad campaign’ budget, thank you.”

Finally, I can turn my music up. I think everyone has gone home for the night. I love me some Donny Hathaway. My mother always said I was an old soul. But a little Drake now and then don’t hurt. Let me get out of here and pick up some tacos to take home if they are still open. If not, maybe I will make me an egg white omelet and take my butt to bed.

Maybe I will call the doctor for a little physical tonight. Naw, I will take my ass to bed.

Want more Zena and Maximus? The story continues in the September 2018 edition of Las Vegas Black Image Magazine.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Date posted:

“I’m excited to get out there and help”

Kellie Hawthorne

As she inches closer to completing her final year at Touro UniversityNevada, Kellie Hawthorne can say thather life has taken her in a complete circle.

Hawthorne, a student in Touro’s School of Physician Assistant Studies(PA), grew up down the street from TheShade Tree shelter on the outskirts ofNorth Las Vegas. As a Touro student,she’s worked on the university’s mobilehealthcare unit that serves the populations not far from where she grew up.

She’s also worked at the Stallman Touro Clinic inside The Shade Tree,gaining critical healthcare experiencewith women and children who live in the shelter near her childhood home.

Even as a child, Hawthorne would volunteer at activity centers around herneighborhood. She knew she wanted tohelp people, she just didn’t know in whatcapacity.

“My family always made sure I was surrounded with love and support, but growing up, I noticed there were quite a few families in my neighborhood who didn’t have the same resources,” she said. “That’s what really drew me into wanting to help people at an early age.”

Hawthorne grew up with her father, a 13-year veteran of the U.S. Navy, as well as her aunt and grandmother. At 11 years old, she began accompanying her father on his appointments to the VA Hospital and learned what a PA was.

“The first person my dad would see at the hospital was the PA,” she recalled. “He really liked his PA, and those experiences helped point me in that direction for my career.”

As a teenager, Hawthorne continued preparing for her future. While she waited for the bus to take her to work, people from her neighborhood would sit next to her and strike up conversation.

“Sometimes, they would just sit and ask me questions about what I wanted to do when I got older,” she recalled. “I would tell them that I wanted to become a PA or a doctor, and they were surprised because they didn’t think people from our neighborhood could become those things. Having the support is important, but having the drive and desire to want to do more is just as important.”

Hawthorne and her family continuously moved during her youth. She attended four different high schools before graduating from Spring Valley High School in 2009. The constant moving never deterred her from her studies, though, and she would go on to attend the University of Nevada, Reno and graduate with her undergraduate degree in Neuroscience.

When it came to applying to PA school, Hawthorne submitted applications to Touro, as well as a few California schools.

“I was hoping I’d get into Touro because I wanted to stay close to my father,” she said. “This is my home, and if I want to gain a stronger network in the field, this is where I need to be.”

In addition to staying close to her father, Hawthorne was attracted to Touro because of the university’s diversity and commitment to serving the community.

“I love that our program really encompasses diversity,” she said. “Touro is also really big on community service, and that means a lot to me because of where I grew up. Having both the mobile healthcare clinic and the clinic inside The Shade Tree, Touro has shown me that it really cares.”

After graduation, Hawthorne plans to work in family practice and help improve the state’s reputation regarding health care.

She grew up to help people just like she wanted, only this time she knows how she’ll help them.

“All I can do is treat my patients the way they should be treated,” she said. “I’m excited to get out there and help whoever I can.”

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

Forward Progress: Caravan for Mammogram

Date posted:

 

The 1st Annual Caravan for Mammogram aims to raise breast cancer awareness — and the importance of early detection — among black women.

On Oct. 6, Las Vegas Black Image Magazine will host the 1st Annual Caravan for Mammogram to raise breast cancer awareness among African-American women.

The Caravan for Mammogram event will bring women together to decorate their cars in pink and black balloons for a drive through Las Vegas. The objective is simple and powerful: reminding women to receive their annual mammograms. Black women suffer higher mortality rates from breast cancer, owing mostly to a lack of early detection.

Dr. Annette Mayes is the grand marshal for the 1st Annual Las Vegas Caravan for Mammogram. The free event will begin at her offices (700 Shadow Lane in Las Vegas) on Saturday, Oct. 6 at 9 a.m. for decorating, with the caravan beginning at noon. There will be health care information booths available, along with music and food at the start and finish of the caravan. Participants must register by calling (702) 615-8216 to receive a registration form, or picking up registration forms at Dr. Mayes’ office.

For additional information call: (702) 615-8216 or (702) 743-9613. You can also email cdalasvegas@gmail.com to register, receive vendor information, and find sponsorship opportunities.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

HEALTHIER YOU: Vaccinating while pregnant?

Date posted: August 15, 2018

Vaccinating while pregnant?

BY DR. ANNETTE MAYES, OB/GYN

DR. ANNETTE MAYE

Every woman who is considering pregnancy should be up-to-date on all of her vaccines. It helps to protect you and your child from serious diseases.

For example, rubella is a contagious disease that can be very dangerous if you get it while you are pregnant. In fact, it can cause a miscarriage or serious birth defects. Best protection against rubella is MMR (Measles-mumps-rubella) vaccine — but if you aren’t up-to-date, you’ll need it before you get pregnant.

Make sure you have a pre-pregnancy blood test to see if you are immune to the disease. Most women received the MMR vaccination as children, but you should confirm this with your doctor. If you need to get vaccinated for rubella, you should avoid becoming pregnant until one month after receiving the MMR vaccine — and, ideally, not until your immunity is confirmed by a blood test.

Did you know that your baby gets disease immunity from you during pregnancy? This immunity will protect your baby from some diseases during the first few months of life, but immunity decreases over time.

You probably know that when you are pregnant, you share everything with your baby. That means when you get vaccines, you aren’t just protecting yourself — you are giving your baby some early protection, too. The Centers for Disease Control recommends you get a whooping cough and flu vaccine during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.

For additional information, contact the Las Vegas All Women’s Care Offices at (702)522-9640. Or visit us at 700 Shadow Lane No. 165 (1st floor) in Las Vegas.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

WELL WOMEN OF COLOR | Rosalind Brooks

Date posted:

Easy Being Green

“Greening up” your life can be as simple as incorporating lifestyle changes at home.

Kitchen
Avoid using the microwave whenever possible. You’ll find that reheating in a pot or skillet heat can be about as as fast — literally in minutes.

Run the dishwasher only when full and at night — that’s more efficient and reduces the carbon footprint. Or better yet: go back to the good old-fashioned method of hand washing. We have a dishwasher, but only use it as a dish drain for the dishes we wash. I love it!

Bathroom
To prevent reintroducing germs to the face, use a facecloth only once.

Look up natural recipes to make your own cleaning products. Reducing the chemicals you use is a big step toward living green. I make my own cleanser, bath cleaner, as well as body soap, shampoo, toothpaste, body scrub and facial toner. All chemical free!

Bedroom
The blue light from a phone, computer, or other electronic device can foster sleeplessness. Learn to unplug in order to wind down and induce more restful and peaceful sleep.

Plastic
Each year, plastic bags in the ocean kill 100,000 sea animals. It is estimated that by 2050, the world’s oceans will contain more plastic than fish.

Beyond recycling, try to limit the products that you buy in plastic. The average family accumulates on average 1,500 plastic bags — with 99% ending up in landfills and oceans.

In the U.S., 1,500 water bottles are thrown away every second — and 500 million plastic straws are discarded daily. We have to do better!

By the way: plastics numbered 1, 3, 6, or 7 are prone to leaching into food or drinks — so drink out of glass whenever possible.

For more information on living a healthier lifestyle from the inside-out, join our results based program, Wellness University at wellnessuniversity.life

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

MOVING THE NEEDLE: Are We Ready for School?

Date posted:

Are We Ready for School?

BY DR. TIFFANY TYLER

Dr Tiffany Tyler

This month, students across Nevada will return to school, and there will be shopping, registration and angst over who will be in whose class.

As this annual pilgrimage begins, it is important to ask a very simple but consequential question: “Are we ready?” Are we prepared to support and ensure student success? As we gauge preparedness, are we taking a holistic account of school readiness?

Maybe we’ve taken our traditional approaches to returning to school. Frequently, our preparation efforts include purchasing uniforms, school supplies and shoes. It may include a return to reading or an earlier bedtime. However, true readiness must encompass the preparation of students, the traditions of families, and a community ideal that ensures all students are poised for success.

To accomplish this preparation, I suggest that we consider whether we prepared our children for the return to school by ensuring they are ready in mind, body and spirit.

In the case of their minds, do they have the psychological and emotional security needed to focus properly? Similarly, in the case of the body, have we ensured children have the proper medical, dental and vision health needed to excel? Moreover, in the case of the spirit, do children have the benefit of our belief and faith in their abilities, aptitude and potential?

You may be tempted to believe that these are questions that only students and their families can ask. While they can and do, I submit that these are questions that we must ask as a community.

As a community, we can ask how we are contributing to the emotional and psychological safety needed to ensure student focus. Have we addressed the myriad social issues that often erode emotional and psychological safety — like unemployment and underemployment, lack of affordable housing, and food insecurity?

We can ask how we are addressing healthcare and healthcare access. If we adopt a more holistic approach to determining if we are ready for school, we may choose to support organizations addressing critical health and basic needs.

Furthermore, we can collectively agree to foster and maintain a community ethos that supports our highest goals for children. We can choose a narrative that empowers children through a collective belief that they can achieve anything: new heights, new possibilities, a new future for us all!

With this belief in mind, I ask you to join me in ensuring we are all ready for school!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz

My America!

Date posted:

My America!

BY ERIC TROY, M.A.

Eric Troy

On July 4, we celebrated our country’s 242 years of independence from the British Empire and adoption of the Declaration of Independence by the Continental Congress. There were parades, fireworks, cookouts, concerts and the all-American pastime of baseball.

But one of the most important activities is honoring family. However you define family, we should follow the impulse to pay homage to those who paved the way for us to celebrate what it really means to be “independent.”

Independence is defined as “freedom from control, influence, support, aid, or the like, of others.” As we look at the state of affairs in our country today, independent thought has been lost — and that loss has had a major impact on what makes our families and country better. Diversity in thinking, and respect for each other’s views, are the basis of what it means to be an American. This diversity in thinking should never be justified with hatred and the degrading of others.

Unfortunately, today’s climate has elevated an agenda that there is a white America and then everyone else. Just turn on the news or log on to social media: we are still seeing Black men and other persons of color, along with the LGBT community, being treated like they don’t belong in America. It seems like we have turned back time to the 1960s.

The inscription on the Statue of Liberty states “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breath free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore.” It is my hope that — as we continue to celebrate our country’s independence — we don’t forget the value of independent thinking and continue to understand it is allows America to become greater in its “independence.”

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Buzz