MOVING THE NEEDLE

Date posted: July 14, 2018

A Real Safety Net for Our Kids

BY DR. TIFFANY TYLER

Dr Tiffany Tyler

In the wake of the school shootings occurring nationally, we must come to understand that real safety includes the psychological security of knowing that others care, others will notice, and others will respond. Kids need the safety of knowing that others care when they are hurting and believe there is no way out; the safety of knowing that others will notice their presence, absence, needs, challenge, value, and crisis; the safety of knowing that someone will respond when they believe there is nowhere left to turn.

In the absence of this safety, we are finding there is no safety net for our children in schools. More and more, children are choosing harm in the absence of this safety.

Mistakenly, we believe that children are “snapping.” When in reality, what has snapped is their belief in our ability to notice, care about, and respond to their pain, challenges, and needs. Believing the lines of communication, hope or change have “snapped,” children are harming themselves and others!

As a community, we cannot sit idly by and watch as children lose their lives, one after another. We must ensure there is a safety net in place for children who believe they are the forsaken, forgotten, and forgone.

If we are to be successful in ensuring all children are safe, we must be successful in ensuring no child goes unnoticed. We must be successful in ensuring all children are heard. We must be successful in ensuring that children understand the possibility of a new day unfettered by pain. This is the safety we must demand and ensure, if we are to ensure our children’s safety.

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Black Image Community Billboard – July 2018

Date posted:

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Stars BET on it

Date posted:

Awards show spectacular celebrates the superstars who define pop culture.

The 2018 BET Awards — which includes the BET Experience extravaganza — were recently hosted at L.A. Live in Los Angeles. Hosted by Jamie Foxx, presenters and performers included: T.I., Kevin Hart, Jason Mitchell, Nicki Minaj, Migos, Janelle Monae, and Ella Mai.

The BET Awards recognize artists, entertainers, and athletes in a number of categories. The nominees and winners are selected by BET’s Voting Academy, which is comprised of fans and an esteemed group of entertainers professionals in the fields of television, film, music, social media, digital marketing, sports journalism, public relations, and the creative arts.

This year’s winners included: Best Female R&B/Pop artist—Beyonce; Best male R&B/Pop artist—Bruno Mars; Best Video of the Year—Drake, “God’s Plan”; B e s t Female Hip-Hop artist—Cardi B; Best Male Hip-Hop artist—Kendrick Lamar; Best Group—Migos; Best Collaboration—DJ Khaled, Rihanna, and Bryson Tiller for “Wild Thoughts”; Best Film—Black Panther; Best Actor—Chadwick Boseman; Best Actress—Tiffany Haddish; Lifetime Achievement Award and tribute—Anita Baker; Best International Act—Nigerian Singer Davido; Best New Artist—SZA

Foxx returned as host at a particularly busy moment in his acclaimed career. The actor, musician, and renowned comedian most recently appeared in Edgar Wright’s critically acclaimed, “Baby Driver,” alongside Ansel Elgort, and currently executive produces and hosts interactive game show, “Beat Shazam,” now in its second season. In November, Fox will star in Lionsgate’s “Robin Hood” opposite Taron Egerton and Jamie Dornan. Foxx also recently wrapped production on his directorial debut, “All-Star Weekend.”

Ella Mai

Jamie Foxx

H.E.R.

Janelle Monae

Migos

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A Mother’s Love

Date posted:

Deborah Harris

Deborah Harris and her mother

I called my mother during my lunchtime and asked her to please press my hair — something she hasn’t done for me since I was a little girl.

I went to my mother yesterday because I needed something familiar — a safe place. I needed her hands on me. I needed to be reminded that although I am growing in a different direction from what she herself has gone through, I am my mother’s daughter in so many ways.

I needed her love to surround me and remind me to be grateful because hundreds and thousands — due to unjust incarceration, and this administration’s policy of separating immigrant children and parents — are in very bad situations now. Thank you mommy for strengthening and blessing me with this crown of twists and tangles.

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If You’re A Senior Like Me, Then It’s No On 3!

Date posted:

BY LOUIE OVERSTREET

Louie Overstreet

My opposition is based on two factors: 1) It doesn’t rise to the level of amending the Nevada Constitution; and 2) it will very likely cause rate increases.

The latter is the last thing we need in Nevada, given the cost to cool homes and businesses in the summer. Ballot Question 3, if approved, would dismantle Nevada’s existing electricity system — one of the most reliable and affordable in the nation — and replace it with a new, unknown system established by the legislature and the courts.

The negative impacts on residents and businesses could include billions in increased taxes, the loss of thousands of good-paying jobs, and possible disruption of Nevada’s progress toward a renewable energy future. It would also eliminate consumer protections that help keep a lid on Nevada’s electricity rates.

In the late 1990s, many states, including Nevada, tried to implement laws like Question 3. California’s attempt in early 2000s led to skyrocketing rates, rolling blackouts, and more than $40 billion in added costs for taxpayers.

Of the 24 states that originally attempted a proposition like Question 3, only 14 states still have deregulated electricity systems in place. In those states, the average residential electric rates are 30% higher than Nevada’s — and California’s overall rates are nearly double ours.

If passed, the state’s major provider, NV Energy, would be forced to sell its power plants and cancel long-term energy agreements, many of which are for renewable energy projects being built right here in Nevada. Those costs would be in the billions — and guess who it will be passed on to pay the bill? In fact, a recent independent investigation conducted by the Public Utilities Commission found that Question 3 would likely increase average residential electric bills for Nevadans for at least a decade.

Check it out for yourself. But for me, I want reliable “power to the people” at affordable rates. As such, I am pulling the plug on Question 3 by voting no.

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PEACE: Stay the Course

Date posted:

 

The experiences and encounters in our personal lives are a sign that the road we travel is ever-changing. The evolution of the universe exposes the truth we must face: the real and sometimes unpleasant reality that our lives will always change, and the only safe route is to stay the course.

Routines give us peace. The routine of knowing that unconditional love is there and should never be taken for granted. Always celebrate the people and places that bring meaning and purpose to your day-to-day life. Spend time on the most important things in your life — the things you treasure most.

The things that you treasure require attention. Even if you and your needs are things you treasure — find the time to properly schedule you in the equation of life.

Ex-out those things and people that brings stress, discomfort, and negativity. The life we live gives us only today — and it can never be recaptured. So, remember to live the best life possible, and give time and space to those who have priority.

“Stay the course.” It is a charge fueled by the purpose around you, as you smile with gratitude for God’s gifts. Your peace will soon manifest into daily joy.

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What is your favorite childhood memory of your mother?

Date posted: June 6, 2018

What is your favorite childhood memory of your mother?

Yvonne Lewis My mom was a Trauma/Emergency Room Nurse at UMC when it used to be Southern Memorial Hospital. I remember she would send me to pick up her check. This must have been like 1981 — before direct deposit. She trusted me in two ways. To go to one of her jobs and act right and to bring her check home. My mom’s name is Grace Henderson.

Vicki Fluellen-Alexander My favorite memory of my mother was when we were little girls, she made our Christmas time so very special — she would set out our little table set, with our dolls and dishes along with candy, nuts, and fruits. She made our home festive. Those were the best times.

Tonya Fortson We learned at an early age that we had to share her with others. My mom was always sharing her time, her heart, and our home with others — especially kids and those in need. She gave her all when she was teaching, working in her community and church, and supporting her family — which she continues to do today.

Robbin Purvis My mother was very giving of her time to reaching out with an extended hand — not only to her church, community and friends, but to her family. My fondest memory is when mom took me to the circus in Baltimore. We had a really good time together. This is my absolute favorite photo of my mom.

Renee Chatman I remember when my father was in Vietnam, my mom was working, raising five girls, and building our first family home from the ground up! It was my first memory and realization that my mom is a Superwoman! Even at 83, she’s still going strong. Love my mom!

Quinsonya Smith One of my favorite memories of my mom was when it was my mom’s payday she would go and get hushpuppies for us and we would do a puzzle together. My mom was a single mother of 3 that worked two jobs to provide for us and I thank her for that. Love you Pat Knox!

Patricia LW Snowden My fondest memory was in April. April 1st through the end of April we would party. Mother’s birthday is April 18 and then she gave birth to me April 12. Let the parties begin.

Norman Erik Pullen Since I was the youngest and only male child, my mom and I would sometimes drive around town finding garage sales. We did that while my older sisters were at my grandmother’s house.

Myrtle Colemam My mother, Ms. Ida Mae Coleman was the best mother in the world. When I was 4 year of age I would stand in a chair and sing in my dad’s choir. The gospel song, “The Blood That Jesus Shed for Me,” was the first song my mother taught me. She was amazing and could play the piano and the organ. She was also the first black hairdresser and the first black teacher for Vo Tech High School. She was an amazing musical leader for her husband’s church, Second Baptist Church, and the list goes on about my mother and her love.

Monica Ford My birth mother and stepmother have given me fond memories. They are true examples of Corinthians love. I was blessed twice with amazing, supportive, nurturing women who molded me into who I am today.

Louie Overstreet My fondest memory is of her kindness to everyone.

Lola C. Bradley My favorite memory of my mother is when we would go to my aunt’s house when they had card parties and listen to music.

LaVona Lewis My fondest memory of my mother when I was a child was laying on the floor with her, coloring. I absolutely loved how beautiful she would trace the pictures first then softly fill them in with color. I would practice and practice hoping to be as good as she was.

Kimberly Harrison My mother always had a passion to feed the less fortunate then moved on to feed the women and children for Christmas from 2003-2015. My mother is amazing.

Kimberly E. Bailey One of my favorite memories of my mother was when my mom made my senior prom dress. I had her make so many changes that I KNOW it took God’s grace to keep her from screaming! However, she made that dress so beautiful and I was very pleased with the results. Thanks mom! I’ll never forget all the things you’ve done for me. I wonder if she will consider making my wedding dress?

Iris Brumfield I have so many wonderful memories with my mother — but the best one I can remember of my childhood was that I was always happy. We always had food, I always had clothes, and a roof over my head. I didn’t realize how poor we were until I was grown. My mom did a great job as a single parent and she always had positive affirmations for me every day. Love her to death.

Kathy Lattimore My favorite memory of my mom is how she always spent time with me and my siblings. She never sent us to church, she took us. We always laughed and played games. She gave us a kiss every night and she’s still that way at 81 years old.

Gail Anderson I remember when my mother would take me, my grandmother, and my godsister to Sambo’s restaurant for coffee and desserts.

Felecia Gaines One of my fondest childhood memories was sitting in the kitchen talking with my mother and watching her cook Thanksgiving and Christmas meals for the family.

Edy Agee I remember crawling up into her bed just to be in her presence.

Dr. Tiffany Tyler I remember picking Sunday dresses together.

Dottie Davis I remember watching my mom bake pound cakes from scratch that would melt in your mouth.

Demetrice Nixon I remember going fishing with my Mommy! Those were the days where she would just take me away to the marina in Ventura with a packed lunch of egg sandwiches, chips and juice. We would just talk, laugh and fish for hours! I love my Mommy!

Dani Corley I remember hearing her sing anywhere. It always made me cry. Happy and sad tears. I still love the sound of her singing to this very day. She even kind of sings when she talks. My favorite thing about my Mommy will always be her voice.

Danette Moreland I remember waking up to my mom’s breakfast in the morning. She taught me how to cook in the kitchen while preparing Thanksgiving dinner.

Crystal Nicole Pullen My mother’s entire existence is my favorite and always will be…RIP FOREVER MOM.

Chris Holliday My favorite memory of my mother was staying up late doing tie-dye shirts for picture day when I was in kindergarten. She is definitely one of the reasons I love crafts today.

Cheryl Hall McElroy Mother Betty Collins Stanton: 8/5/26- 11/25/2017 R.I.H. mom. We miss you greatly.

Char Burns-Logan Oh wow! I have so many memories of my mother. But one that really stands out was that she would make sure my siblings and I had a hot, homecooked breakfast every morning before sending us off to school.

Carol Bolden Peterson One of my favorite memories was watching my mother prepare her first-grade classroom each August at JE Manch Elementary School. She taught in Clark County for 30+ years.

Aaliyah Ratliff My favorite memory of my mom is when she dressed up my friends, herself and me as Lisa & The Cult Jam musical group. We would put on a talent show for my little brothers and my dad. She has always been so much fun. I love her.

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Ask Your Mother

Date posted:

Moms share secrets for raising healthy, happy children

Mary J. Brooks-Clayton A mother should put — and keep — God first. Trust that God has blessed you with the tools to keep faith in him as well as yourself. Trust and respect your children, and they will trust and respect you. Instill the fear of God in their lives.

Lorri Holloman The secret to being a great mother is having an open heart — and listening twice as much as you speak.

Lakiko V. Cole Understand that you are human and will make mistakes. There is no guidebook for being a good mother. Being a great mother is about being there when your children need you, and being honest and open with them. I always ask myself the question, “Do my children respect what they see when they look at me?”

Kimberly Smith I always have open communication with my children. I talk to them to impress upon them to be leaders and not followers — and that practice makes perfect.

Dena Gaskin The secret is to be the best example you can be, and put God in the upbringing of your children. Teach them compassion, self-respect and respect for others.

Alicia Henson As a mother, I learned to be patient, to teach, and to hold my children accountable for their actions. Praise them for doing well, and love them to the ends of the earth — no matter what.

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Under the Glittering Lights

Date posted: June 5, 2018

Night at the Palms

The Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, which is is undergoing a $620 million renovation, celebrated with an exclusive opening that included fashion and entertainment influencers, world renowned artists, and legends in and nightlife and hospitality. Hip-hop artist J. Cole capped the celebration with a surprise private performance at the new Apex Social Club.

J. Cole

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Uncover Your History With Open Eyes

Date posted:

BY TIFFANY MAYES EHOLOR

Tiffany Mayes Eholor

My mother is black and my father is white. And I’m reclaiming my history — as a native Nevadan.

After watching the “60 Minutes” segment reported by Oprah Winfrey, I became curious about the grand opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala.

This monument documents the lynching of thousands of African-American men, women and children for 70 years following the Civil War. I was especially struck by the story of Wes Johnson, whose brutal 1937 murder was witnessed by thousands of Americans who celebrated in the town square while wearing their Sunday best to witness his lynching.

And? That was then, this is now. Remember where you came from.

My mother’s family moved out west from Louisiana in 1945, to the racially segregated town of Hawthorne, Nevada for employment at the Naval Ammunition Depot, which was established in 1930.

My great-grandfather, Manuel Gray, founded and organized the Hawthorne NAACP, which became officially chartered on May 22, 1955. Hawthorne, in Mineral County, was one of the three major NAACP branches — with Las Vegas and Reno as the other two in the State of Nevada. Manuel Gray’s son — my grandfather, Otis Gray — became president of the Hawthorne NAACP Chapter.

The United States Congress passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and business in Hawthorne, NV immediately abandoned their practices. In an article in the Mineral County Independent-News, my grandfather, wrote: “To those who said there would be trouble when public accommodations in this locality were open to all, we are proud to say that there has not been one single incident that has happened to bring about ill-feeling between the races in this town, nor do we or the law enforcement agencies expect any.”

March 31, 1965: The Mineral County Independent-Newspaper publishes, “Hawthorne NAACP Supports Plea for Civil Rights Bill”

The President and some members of the Mineral County NAACP traveled to Carson City, NV on March 22, 1965 to attend a Civil Rights meeting on the Capital grounds. Along with other NAACP groups from Reno, Sparks and Las Vegas; they gave their presence in support of passage of a strong Civil Rights Bill. Otis D. Gray, President of the Mineral County branch, spoke at length and said, “We have assembled once again as we have many times previously and for the same purpose. Why, when will, and how long will it take our legislators to visualize the need of strong Civil Rights Laws to protect its citizens against civil injustice.” The article goes onto to read: “There seems to be a “dragging of the feet” on the part of the legislators. Actions speak louder than a multiple of words. We wonder if they are waiting for a “Selma” in Nevada before they will recognize the past due need for this type of law. We hope that when this article is in print, the 31st of this month, the Nevada Civil Rights Bill will have been passed in the Senate.”

Nevada finally passed a state civil rights bill in 1965; it was neither the first nor the last piece of legislation that advocates urged Nevada lawmakers to pass to ensure equal rights for all Nevadans regardless of race or gender. State legislators rejected five previous attempts (1939, 1949, 1953, 1957 and 1961) on claims that Nevada did not need such laws. Nevertheless, one year after the passage of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, a coalition of supporters, led by the Reno, Las Vegas and Hawthorne Branches of the NAACP, succeeded. My grandfather led one of the four within Nevada. Nevada’s statute, as finally passed, prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and employment by race, color, religion or national origin.

My grandfather was, indeed, my favorite person to listen to growing up as a child. I would hear him tell his stories of traveling the world in WWII. I would watch him smoke his pipe on the porch of my grandparents’ house on breezy Saturday afternoons. These are the memories that I cherish.

My mother, the eldest child of Otis and Irene Gray, Lillian Ann Gray, soon became the first black secretary for the Administration Department for Captain Tetrick and Commander Bergman of the Naval Department at Hawthorne Naval Ammunition Military Depot.

She eventually moved to Carson City to work for the Government Division Bureau of Reclamation. She married my father and became a working mother of three and dedicated wife. I, the middle child, graduated Carson High School in 1996. I won the crown of Miss Carson City Nevada with the Miss America Scholarship Program. I was the first African- American to hold this title in Nevada’s capital.

Years later, when I worked as Harry Belafonte’s personal assistant in New York City, I would take my lunch breaks at the park subway station on 72nd and Broadway and chat with my grandfather on the phone. Living in New York was exciting, but it also had its lonely times. My grandfather would talk to me when I didn’t want to listen to anyone else. The history I mentally had to process while working for one of the most iconic social rights leaders in modern history, Mr. Harry Belafonte, at times left me numb with the sobering truth of this country’s history. It was my grandfather that helped me stay grounded in hope and love and humility at the young age of 25.

I’m so thankful to be present in a time in history where journalists and producers see fit to air global coverage of the United States’ dark, evil, sick, hidden history: slavery and the terrorism that controlled an entire class of human beings — men, women and children.

I’m speechless that so many people are either: unaware (captivated in psychological denial) of U.S. history; or still systematically traumatized (captivated in fear and shame) by U.S. history to the point that they feel unable to watch, talk about, or heal from the atrocities that this United States of America was founded on.

I do believe a new day dawns every day. Keep telling your story. My story is black and white communication relationship development, which traces back from before my conception. Truth always prevails. We owe this fact to our ancestors — all of our ancestors. No time. No space.

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