PHOTOS OF THE MONTH – OCTOBER 2018

Date posted: November 4, 2018

Songstress and author Brittany Soul with Mary House and Pastor House.

Shaquille O’Neal visits local Vegas Ballin Fades Barbershop and greets fellow Q Frat brother James Spoaty Allen.

Many attend First Lady Michelle Obama’s get-out-the-vote rally in Las Vegas

Kennedi Madisen Taylor and her daughters

First Lady Michelle Obama speaks at Chaparral High School.

Eddie Mustafa Muhammad and Michael Spinks

U.S. Senator Cory Booker

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Under the Glittering Lights

Date posted:

Women making an impact

The non-profit organization Parent Citywide recently presented some outstanding women with the Impactful Women Award. The awards gala took place at Arizona Charlie’s Casino & Hotel, with one objective: to honor Las Vegas women in the areas of education, community service, politics, economic development, and entertainment/media. Parent Citywide’s mission includes “[enhancing] the educational, cultural and social wholeness of African American children and all children and parents in the city of Las Vegas.” Founder and executive director Janet Hurd was among the presenters.

President and founder of Heart and Soul Hospitality
Community Development Corporation Li’Shey Johnson is awarded.

North Las Vegas City Councilwoman Pamela Goynes-Brown’s husband congratulates her on her award.

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Calling All Visionaries: RTC Wants to Hear From You about the Future of Transportation

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The Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada (RTC) is “calling all visionaries” and inviting all Southern Nevadans to help shape On Board, the future transit plan for the Las Vegas valley. With the help of extensive community input, the RTC is identifying how improvements to the current bus system, new high-capacity transit services and emerging transit technologies can improve mobility.

A quick survey focused on how valley residents want to get around the region and what priorities should guide comprehensive transportation planning and improvements is available at OnBoardSNV.com. Feedback from this and a prior survey issued last year about public transit services will be used to develop a draft plan that will be shared with the community later this year.

Participants interact with the On Board bus at a local event.

“To date we’ve heard from more than 15,000 residents, and we hope that is just the beginning,” said RTC General Manager Tina Quigley. “The only way we can develop community is to hear from everyone. It’s important to note the survey isn’t just for those who ride transit. It’s for all Southern Nevadans to provide input on how they want to get around the valley regardless of their current preferred transportation mode. We are making it as easy as possible to participate via an online survey, and we are taking the survey to the community at various events and presentations around town.”

In addition, later this year, residents can provide additional feedback on proposed transit improvements for the busy Maryland Parkway corridor. RTC transit currently carries more than 9,000 riders daily on the Maryland Parkway route, the busiest residential transit route in the valley. With nearly 36,000 vehicles traveling the road daily and more than 90,000 residents and 85,000 jobs within a quarter mile of the corridor, Maryland Parkway is ripe for a high-capacity transit system to improve mobility and spur economic development.

There are three transit options currently under consideration for Maryland Parkway:

  1. Enhanced Bus Service – Reduce the number of bus stops along the current transit route so they’re farther apart (from a quarter to a third of a mile) creating more of an express route to decrease total travel time. On routes where this has been done, such as Sahara Avenue and Flamingo Road, ridership has increased.
  2. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) – Two of Maryland Parkway’s six travel lanes could be in a dedicated lane on the side. Buses would maintained because the lanes are available for cars to use for right turns.
  3. Light Rail – Single light rail vehicles operating in the outer lanes dedicated for transit but still available for cars to make right turns. This option can accommodate the most passengers and offer the shortest travel times.

The On Board survey is available at OnBoardSNV.com, where you can learn more about the RTC’s efforts to engage and partner with the community as it develops plans for Southern Nevada’s future transportation needs. Be part of the plan and get On Board!

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‘The black community has an equal right to recover’

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Norris Scott examines how a legacy of discrimination leaves too many African- Americans without the resources to defeat addiction.

Norris Scott and Adam Laxalt

I grew up in the early 1960s, a period of heavy segregation. I did not have the same privileges as a white child.

As I matured, I saw the barriers. I saw how my teachers lacked the cultural competency to manage their bias in the classroom. When I moved from Georgia to Massachusetts, I was finally able to see — for the first time — how segregation had greatly affected my opportunities.

My school placed me in a special education class. I struggled with this decision, and no one took the time to explain the reasoning. This led to confusion, shame, insecurity, depression, isolation — and later, drugs. All of this reinforced my ideas on segregation in the black communities.

I began noticing that black parents were not invited to parent-teacher meetings — and if they were, the teachers were not welcoming. As a result, the black parents tended to be less informed and less communicative.

I recall hearing my white peers talking with their families about safety and making good choices. For me and my classmates, these conversations simply did not occur. Can you see how this leads to other problems in life?

Coming home feeling less-than and unaccepted created a negative sentiment towards education in general. I didn’t even feel empowered to do my homework.

And why would I? I didn’t have positive reinforcement in my home. My elders lacked education and were struggling with substance abuse. I had to find inspiration elsewhere. The drug dealers and criminals represented success — glamorizing illegal activities, and becoming heroes of a sort. I started pursuing interests that were detrimental to my overall health and well-being.

I often experience divisive thoughts and notice other black individuals experiencing the same thing. Part of this involves buying into the idea that certain things “are for white people.” I’ve noticed myself slipping into this mentality, and I believe this has continued for generations.

It’s time for the black community to stop perpetuating the stigma that we don’t deserve equal opportunity for recovery from addiction. All of this can start with our community educating itself on how to get politically active and #StandUp4Recovery. The black community has an equal right to recover. All people with addiction issues have a right to recover.

All of this is why I got involved with Recovery PAC. I #StandUp4Recovery because I stand up for my right to recover. Will you join the movement?

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50 Shades Of Black: A Fictitious Exotic Journey For “The Best Part”

Date posted:

Love at First Bite

The morning dew was fresh on the leaves, and Zena was still asleep. She keeps the window open to capture the fresh air, and a cool and satisfying breeze meets the opening of her eyelids.

She reaches for the alarm clock and realizes immediately — she’s late for her first day on the new job.

“Oh, my God!” Zena runs to the shower, jumps in, and glides a sponge soaked in natural soap all over her body. Sprinkles from the splashing water gives her naturally curly hair a sparkle, even before she rubs in the essential oils.

Contemplating what to wear — the burnt orange pantsuit or the cranberry wrap dress — Zena grabs her jacket and takes a glance in the mirror before leaving her condo.

As she drives down the freeway, thoughts of the unknown run through her mind as she thinks the new job and expectations. She slowly glances up looking at the building that will be her new workplace. “Wow, the building didn’t look this big when I was here last,” she murmurs to herself.

All eyes are on Zena as she approaches the reception desk.

“Hello, I am Zena Mitchell — here to see Mr. Spoon.”

The receptionist looks up from her computer. “Oh, you must be the new graphic artist?” Zena answers reluctantly: “Yes, I am.”

“Welcome to Onyx & Partners. Just one moment while I call him. Mr. Spoon, Zena Mitchell is here. He will be right down.”

Zena smiles, “Okay. Thank you.”

Still excited to be joining one of the largest black-owned advertising firms in Atlanta, Zena tells herself to be friendly — but not overly familiar with her co-workers until she finds her way.

Maximus leans back in his office chair to stretch his back. He pushes the button on his office intercom. “Hey Shelly.”

Shelly is shocked. “Mr. Johnson, I didn’t know you were in your office. What time did you come in?”

“I came in at 5 a.m. — I couldn’t sleep,” Maximus says through a yawn, “so I thought it was best to get to work. I am really concerned about the new campaign for our client. We can’t mess it up. I am going to take a break and get some coffee from the conference room. You want some?”

“No thanks, I stopped by Starbucks earlier,” Shelly replies.

Mr. Spoon tells Zena to have some coffee in the conference room while he goes to get her new supervisor. Zena is impressed with the lavish décor.

She looks up as Maximus enters. “Wow, are you my supervisor?”

Maximus looks confused and says, “Well, I guess you can call me the supervisor for everyone here, if you like. You are Ms. Sunshine that I met in the coffee store?”

“No, my name is Zena Mitchell — and now I remember you. I had no idea that you would turn out to be my new boss.”

A tall, stately lady enters the room, “Zena? Hi, I’m Lydia Maxwell, your supervisor. I see you have met Mr. Johnson.”

Zena stammers, “I thought he was my supervisor?” Ms. Maxwell interrupts, “No, this is Mr. Maximus Johnson — CEO and founder of Onyx & Partners.” She chuckles, “Ms. Mitchell I admire how you’re getting to know the company.”

Maximus takes a sip of his coffee and says, “Ms. Mitchell and I recently met informally at my neighborhood coffee shop. What will you be doing here at Onyx?”

Zena clears her throat. “Well, I am your new entry-level graphic artist.”

“And today is her first day,” says Ms. Maxwell.

“That is great,” said Maximus. “Looking forward to seeing your designs. You ladies excuse me.”

Maximus leaves the conference room, followed by Zena’s curious glance. Ms. Maxwell pulls out the conference room chair and sits down next to Zena.

“The professional culture here at Onyx is relaxed, but we are all about the business, outcomes, and goals we set for the company. There is not much of a learning curve. You have to kind of feel your way around, and I’ll give you your assigned projects. Time is of the essence on these campaigns for our clients — and there might be some late nights and early mornings.

She goes on, as Zena tries to take it all in.

“Here is a booklet of some of the campaigns we are developing — so while you are finishing your bagel and coffee, take a look at  them and tell me what print ideas you have. The new desk for your office is coming up from our warehouse, and your office should be ready in the next half-hour. So make yourself comfortable and give me your thoughts on those campaigns in the booklet. I will be back shortly to escort you to your office.”

Maximus reenters the conference room in a rush. “I understand Ms. Maxwell went downstairs to our warehouse?”

Zena replies, “Yes — she might be checking on a desk.”

“I know this is your first day,” Maximus says breathlessly, “but I need a prototype ad designed ASAP for my client’s campaign.”

Zena replies, “Okay, where is the campaign synopsis?”

Maximus hands her the paper. “It’s for our client, Free Cosmetics — natural makeup that lets you be who you are. How long will it take you to put something together?”

“Let me take out my laptop. Check back with me in an hour.”

Maximus smiles and says, “Wow, that’s great. I will see you in a half-hour.” He leaves the conference room, and Zena shakes her head while she starts tapping away on her computer.

She returns to Maximus much faster than he expected. “Yes?” he asked. “It’s only been 15 minutes.”

Zena smiles, “You said you needed something. So I developed a tagline for the campaign.”

Maximus is surprised. “The tagline is the hardest part of any campaign. Let me hear it.

“Live, Laugh, and Love…Unleashed Expressions! By Free Cosmetics.”

The room falls silent. Maximus bends down to look at the words on Zena’s computer. “I love it. I really love it. Zena, it looks like you will have a future here. That bagel looks good. I will let you finish it now.”

Zena smiles, “You want a bite?”

Maximus grins, “No, not now.”

He exits the room with tantalizing swagger — Obama style.

Want more Zena and Maximus? The story continues in the September 2018 edition of Las Vegas Black Image Magazine.

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HEALTHIER YOU: What is a mammogram?

Date posted:

What is a mammogram?

BY DR. ANNETTE MAYES, OB/GYN

DR. ANNETTE MAYE

A mammogram is an X-ray picture of the breast that is used by doctors to look for early signs of breast cancer. It is performed at an imaging center, where you stand in front of a special X-ray machine and a technologist places your breast on a clear plastic plate. Another plate firmly presses your breast from above.

The plates will flatten the breast — holding it still while the X-ray is taken. You will feel some pressure. The steps are repeated to make a side view of the breast. The other breast will be X-rayed in the same way.

You will wait while the technologist checks to make certain the pictures do not need to be re-done. Keep in mind that the technologist cannot tell you the results of your mammogram. Each woman’s mammogram may look a little different, because all breasts are a little different.

Having a mammogram is uncomfortable for most women; some find it painful. A mammogram takes only a few moments, though — and the discomfort is over soon.

What you feel often depends on the skill of the technologist, the size of your breasts, and how much they need to be pressed. Your breasts may be more sensitive if you are about to get or have your period. A doctor with special training, called a radiologist, will read the mammogram. He or she will look at the X-ray for early signs of breast cancer or other issues.

Tips for getting a mammogram:

For additional information, contact the Las Vegas All Women’s Care Offices at (702)522-9640. Or visit us at 700 Shadow Lane No. 165 (1st floor) in Las Vegas.

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WELL WOMEN OF COLOR | Rosalind Brooks

Date posted:

Backyard Chickens Have Personality Galore — Seriously!

Each chicken has their own completely unique, quirky, kooky and endearing personality. They’re stunningly beautiful, too — parading around in a variety of colors, patterns, shapes and sizes. You’ll name them, spoil them with treats, and pick them up for hugs any chance you get. You will also find yourself having conversations with them, which you will find very therapeutic and relaxing.

We all love our dogs, cats, and fish — but do they actually produce something edible? Or pay their own way? Chickens do. And once you’ve dined on their eggs, you’ll never reach for a dozen in the supermarket again. Their eggs are so much more flavorful, because you’ll eat them when they’re only minutes or hours old, not weeks or months. You’ll even see the difference in the yolks, which are a healthy orange — not the pale yellow you’re used to.

Plus, you can feel good about the organic eggs you’ll be feeding your friends and family. All it takes to get organic eggs is organic chicken feed! Research shows that chickens allowed to roam freely and eat greens lay eggs that are higher in Omega-3 fatty acids and Vitamin E — and at the same time, they’re lower in cholesterol than store-bought, too. (Think of your hair and skin!)

Chickens are, after all, the most “chic” pet you could possibly have. And we think it’s time everyone knew. Check with your neighborhood zoning rules to see if having a backyard chicken is legally acceptable. And if you’ve got questions about raising chickens, visit Vegas Roots to see our lil’ beauties.

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African-American Authors to Appear at Las Vegas Book Festival

Date posted:

The 17th Annual Las Vegas Book Festival will spotlight an impressive lineup of award-winning and best-selling African American authors on Saturday, October 20, 2018 — at the Historic Fifth Street School, located at 401 S. Fourth Street. The day-long event begins at 9 a.m. and has a special After Dark program at 7:30 p.m. Festival events are free and open to all ages, including special children’s programming.

Don’t miss this chance to meet New York Times best-selling authors Colson Whitehead and Nnedi Okorafor, as well as many other talented writers, artists, and illustrators who are inspiring the next generation with their distinctive styles and voices. There will also be a fascinating panel discussion on Afrofuturism, an exciting new trend in literature.

Whitehead’s novel, “The Underground Railroad,” won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence, and the National Book Award — among many other honors. His other works have included “The Intuitionist,” “The Zone,” and “Sag Harbor.” Whitehead has taught at University of Houston, Columbia University, Princeton University, and Wesleyan University. He will appear at 4 p.m. in the Fifth Street School Auditorium.

Novelist Okorafor is known for her African- based science fiction, fantasy, and magical realism, which weaves African culture into creative settings and memorable characters. One striking example of this is her work on Marvel’s “Black Panther” comics, launching their new series, “Wakanda Forever.” She is the recipient of numerous awards including a Nebula, a Hugo Award, and an Africana Book Award. Her adult novel, “Who Fears Death,” will be adapted into a TV series by “Game of Thrones” author George R.R. Martin and HBO. Her first appearance will be as part of a “Hero or Villain: Superheroes and Villains for Teens and Adults” panel with CB Lee and Sarah Kuhn at 5:15 p.m.

Okorafor will then appear that evening, along with Gregory Tate and Ingrid LaFleur, as part of a special Las Vegas Book Festival After Dark panel discussion on Afrofuturism, moderated by Niela Orr at 7:30 p.m., also in the auditorium. Inspired by Tate’s illuminating essay on the topic, the discussion will cover, “The Pioneering of the Self in All Spaces: Afrofuturism and the Black-Body-Psyche Unbound.”

Tate, a founding member of the Black Rock Coalition, is a veteran staff writer for well-known publications including The New York Times, Rolling Stone and VIBE. He has taught at New York University, Yale University, Williams College, and Princeton University.

A recent mayoral candidate in Detroit, LaFleur is an artist, activist, and Afrofuturist. Her platform brought the idea of an Afrotopia and “the equitable distribution of the future” into Detroit politics. She has led conversations and workshops at Centre Pompidou in Paris, TEDxBrooklyn, TEDxDetroit, Harvard University, and Oxford University.

Orr is a radio producer the current writer-in-residence at the Black Mountain Institute; her work has been featured in The New York Times Book Review, BuzzFeed, and Elle.

Whitehead is one of three distinguished keynote speakers who will appear, including novelist Sara Shepard, the best-selling author of the new horror thriller “The Elizas” and the hugely popular teen crime thriller “Pretty Little Liars,” which became a series on ABC Family network; and former poet laureate of Los Angeles Luis Rodriguez, author of 15 books including the best-selling memoir, “Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A.,” and “It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions and Healing.”

The Las Vegas Book Festival is produced by the city of Las Vegas, Las Vegas-Clark County Library District, Las Vegas-Clark County Library District Foundation, and Nevada Humanities. For information, please visit www.lasvegasbookfestival.com or call (702) 229-ARTS (2787).

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You can help control the price of power

Date posted:

Chris Charles Scott on how voters can bring common business sense to Nevada’s energy market.

Although I am now a Nevadan, I was raised by my grandmother in East Texas. We had two non-negotiable rules in our household:

Leaving an outside door open while the air conditioning was running was a capital offense in our home. Not being conscious of energy conservation could result in grandmother spanking my behind. But this is not about the spankings I could have taken from my grandmother for causing her energy bill to soar — this is about the spankings that Nevadans are currently taking from NV Energy in the form of soaring energy costs.

NV Energy is a monopoly that controls how, when, and where your energy is generated. It controls the poles and the wires that get energy to your homes and businesses. It controls how you purchase that energy — and how much you have to pay to purchase it. You have no choice.

And because you have no choice, NV Energy could overcharge Nevadans over $300 million in three years for electricity. They did. To break that down, you overpaid an average of $384 a year for three years on your electricity bill.

Yes, you.

And there was nothing you could do about it.

But now there is. On the ballot this year is a question that asks:

“Shall Article 1 of the Nevada Constitution be amended to require the Legislature to provide by law for the establishment of an open, competitive retail electric energy market that prohibits the granting of monopolies and exclusive franchises for the generation of electricity?”

The question is simply asking: “Are you in favor of Nevada creating a new system that will allow other energy retail companies to come in and competitively offer you options regarding how and where you buy your energy — instead of allowing NV Energy to be your only choice?”

As business owners and entrepreneurs, your first instinct should be, “YES!”

To run a business successfully, an owner must find the best price for goods and services. Currently, you have options in every aspect of your business — from which vendors to use, to the courier that ships your goods and products. But you have no choice on the most needed aspect of your business: your energy plan.

Energy costs could drive your profits down and drive you out of business. And when one company, NV Energy, has the unchecked power to overcharge you for that necessity, that could mean failure for your venture.

If you vote Yes on Question 3, and it passes, you will then have the choice to decide where to purchase your electricity and can choose plans from other reputable companies that will be priced competitively to win your business. This competition will bring your energy cost down. That is Business 101.

So, let’s roll up our sleeves and fight the monopoly that threatens your livelihood and takes away your freedom to choose. Vote “YES” on Question 3. And feel free to do this in your school clothes.

Chris Charles Scott is a small business owner and community advocate who is currently working on Yes on Question 3. His award-winning documentary production company Strategery, Films is based in Las Vegas, NV.

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This is How We View It Neighborhood Reunion

Date posted:

This is How We View It Neighborhood Reunion

Families gather at the “This is How We View It” reunion

Dr. Archie Perry and friend

Belinda Denise with family and friends

North Las Vegas City Councilwoman Pamela Goynes Brown

Friends meet up at the “This is How We View It”
reunion

Longtime friends meet up at Valley View neighborhood reunion

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