21st Taste & Sounds of Soul – WATCH & LISTEN NOW!

Date posted: February 20, 2021

Check Out The Taste and Sounds of Soul (Click Here)

PREMIERES FEBRUARY 20, 2021

Download the KTNV Streaming App: You can find the KTNV Streaming App on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire Stick or Andrioid TV devices. Just search KTNV, download the free app, then watch at all the times listed above.

After it premieres on Feb. 20, the show will also be available on-demand — all users will have to do is log on to the app, hit the back button, then scroll down until they see “KTNV Digital Exclusives,” and you’ll be able to find it there.

For more information, visit KTNV.com/Apps

Preview YouTube video Taste and Sounds of Soul 2021 Las Vegas Black Image Magazine Channel 13 KTNV by CDA Media Relations

Keith Wingate, Cox Media Consultant and Chair of Cox’s Southwest Region Diversity & Inclusion Council

Larry Mosley, 100 Black Men of America Las Vegas Chapter Founder and President

____________________________________SPONSORED BY____________________________________

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Community Speaks – February 2021

Date posted: February 15, 2021

What is the first thing you want to see addressed by President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris?

Antonio Holliday I would like to see renters held accountable for at least 60% of their rent. Property owners are losing a ton of money and getting in debt because of bad tenants. They are taking advantage of “no rent or postponed rent.”

Peace Webb I would like the new President and Vice President to deal with police brutality, homelessness, poverty, the wealth gap, all the damage done at the border, justice for Breonna Taylor, and justice for Bill Cosby.

Joseph Anuda Bryant I think the obvious approach is to get COVID handled and get the National Guard back home to their families.

James Allen In this order, the new administration should focus on everything COVID related, then Trump impeachment, and finding the parents of hundreds of children left in detention centers.

Penny Fuller So many things, but at the top of my list — aside from COVID relief — I think about parents and families and how they must be reunited with their children. In response to Trump’s insane practice of separating parents from their children. My mother’s heart hurts over this.

Michael Towers Sr. Work for the people and not the party.

Johanna Perez I would like the President and Vice President to focus on housing for people that lost everything or never had anything to start with.

Isar King Sending Trump and his gang of thugs and thieves to Gitmo.

Stephen Mumford I would like the new administration to combat COVID and go after progressive initiatives such as health care subsidies and/or free healthcare, affordable college, free trade school and college, and declaring war on domestic terrorists and hate groups.

Wilma Easley-Roberts I would like health and wellness to be first on their agenda.

Lovern Costner I would like to see immigration reform and holding people accountable for putting children in cages.

Tony Smith II Make sure there’s no duplicate keys to the White House and then COVID.

Dan Napier There is a list of issues that I think should be dealt with: everything COVID, Trump impeachment, economic stability and jobs, healthcare, education, racial inequality, foreign policy, the environment, infrastructure, winning primary elections and appointing Stacey Abrams as a national coordinator to retain and gain House and Senate seats.

Trench Keith I would like them to revisit the lawsuit Pigford vs. Glickman and provide reparations for Black farmers who were cheated by USDA for decades. Increase compensation to $50 billion in non-repayable land grants and no-interest planting loans.

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PHOTOS OF THE MONTH – FEBRUARY 2021

Date posted:

Vice President Kamala Harris is sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

Lady Gaga greets former President Barack Obama (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

Former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama

Jennifer Lopez sings (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

Former First Lady Michelle Obama

 

President Joe Biden (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

Vice President Kamala Harris and First Gentleman Doug Emhoff wave to the inauguration crowd. (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

President Biden and Vice President Harris share a fist bump. (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden embrace their son Hunter Biden. (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

2021 Inauguration Day on the Washington Mall (DOD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carlos M. Vazquez II)

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FOOD FOR THE SOUL: Organic Grass-fed Filet Mignon w/ Creamy Peppercorn Sauce

Date posted:

Organic Grass-fed Filet Mignon with Creamy Peppercorn Sauce

Organic Grass-fed Filet Mignon with Creamy Peppercorn Sauce

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

Directions

Learn more at www.realorganicchef.com. Contact R.O.C. Team Las Vegas at (702) 762-3278

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Strike Force

Date posted:

Strike Force

BY CLAYTEE WHITE

How Hattie Canty became one of America’s most powerful and revered labor leaders.

In 1990, Hattie Canty won the presidency of the Culinary Workers Union Local 226, the most powerful labor organization in the city of Las Vegas — maybe the entire United States. She led with compassion and courage as she raised eight children alone after losing her husband to cancer in 1975. In 1993, she was instrumental in founding the Culinary Training Academy by partnering with the largest hotel casinos on the Las Vegas Strip.

Canty was born in 1933 in St. Stephens, Alabama. After acquiring several years of education, she began a family and soon left the South. Her migration began in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement — joining many Blacks also leaving for a better life. Most African Americans did not have a concrete definition for “a better life” but they knew that they would recognize it when they began to experience it.

She did not find that envisioned reality at her first stop, San Diego, but discovered it in Las Vegas when she settled here in 1961. First, she tried a job in janitorial services at the Clark County School District. But she hit her stride when she took the job as a maid at the Maxim Hotel Casino and joined Local 226. Wages were good and benefits sufficient — so Canty gained a sense of freedom and became an activist.

If Culinary Workers Union Local 226 was protesting at any location, she would join the picket line after her shift. Soon she was elected to the union’s executive board where, in 1984, she planned a successful 75-day strike. As union president, she led 550 workers at the Frontier Hotel and Gambling Hall in a protest of unfair labor conditions. At that time, it was the longest strike in American history — six years, four months, and ten days! After her initial election, she was re-elected by landslides in 1993 and 1996.

Hattie’s other outstanding achievement was founding a Culinary Academy to train hotel workers in a myriad of positions. The academy trains thousands of hospitality workers each year to reduce poverty and eliminate unemployment by providing employment and vocational skills to youth, adults, and displaced workers.

Canty, one of the greatest labor leaders in American history, passed away on July 12, 2012 at age 79. It was once said that she spent every one of her off-days walking a picket line when there was a picket line to walk. The old Negro Spiritual tells the rest of the story, as The Mighty Clouds of Joy sang:

One of these mornings won’t be very long
You will look for me and I’ll be gone
I
’m going to a place where I’ll have nothing to do,
But just walk around, walk around heaven all day.

White is the Director of the Oral History Research Center at UNLV Libraries

Become a historian: let your curiosity run wild.

Elementary School: Which hotel replaced the Maxim, the Hotel Casino that employed Hattie Canty?

High School and College: The Maxim was located at the corner of Flamingo Road and Koval Lane. Whose life was lost at that intersection on September 7, 1996? Describe his accomplishments.

Adults 17 to 97: Book recommendation about Black Migration to the West: “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” by Isabel Wilkerson

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Black Image Honors

Date posted:

Black Image Honors

We are delighted to showcase this year’s Las Vegas Black Image honorees in the areas of technology, education, health, economic development, government, and the art of dance. Join us in the celebration for these honorees who serve as excellence personified.

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Affordable Housing Opportunities for All Rural Nevadans

Date posted:

Affordable Housing Opportunities for All Rural Nevadans

BY KATIE COLEMAN

“The ache for home lives in all of us. The safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.” Maya Angelou, “All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes”

Nails and beams. Insulation and paint. They’re just some of the things we use to build a house, but they’re not what make a home. To us, home is a feeling – to us, home is what everyone needs and deserves. The Nevada Rural Housing’s mission is to promote, provide and finance affordable housing opportunities for all rural Nevadans, and we live by that mission. Helping fulfill that human craving for a safe place where you can go as you are — it’s what we do.

The Nevada Rural Housing Authority’s story began in 1973 as Nevada’s first housing agency. Over the past five decades, our programs and services have diversified, our clients broadened. “From homeless to homebuyer” — it’s an appropriate way to describe who we serve. Affordable housing is relative, not only reserved for the extremely low-income. Affordable housing is for everyone, and our programs and services are designed to serve and align with our mission.

If it’s not housing and it’s not mission-aligned, we don’t do it.

So, what do we do?

We help rural renters by paying a portion of their rent through the Housing Choice Voucher program. And through the Cares Housing Assistance Program, we’ve assisted 1,000+ renters throughout rural Nevada whose incomes have been negatively impacted by COVID-19, and we will continue our COVID relief work into the foreseeable future.

We help communities understand their housing needs. We find opportunities to rehabilitate existing housing and build new housing. We oversee the management of 612 units on 13 property sites plus seven single-family rentals, all throughout rural Nevada. The majority of our residents are seniors and disabled individuals.

We operate the Weatherization and Home Repair program in the rural parts of the state, which provides audits, repairs and improvements for qualifying households, many of whom are seniors aging in place.

And we have provided nearly $2 billion in mortgages and nearly $55 million in down payment assistance to rural Nevada homebuyers through Nevada Rural Housing Authority’s Home At Last homeownership program – we call it “HAL” for short. That down payment assistance and other affordable homeownership tools in our HAL toolbox have helped more than 9,000 families achieve their dreams of owning a home. And that’s how we measure our success — not by applications and closings, but by the number of lives we can change through the power of homeownership.

Indeed, homeownership can be life changing. The tangible benefits are evident:

The walls are yours to paint (That fuschia you’ve been dreaming of? Do it!).

The yard is yours to design (Time to bring out that green thumb!) and that nopet policy is out the window (Check out HALPals.org to learn more about our pet adoption program!).

And the intangibles, while they don’t come in a paint can, do have a lasting impression.

Did you know that homeowners are 28% more likely to vote than renters?

Did you know homeowners are almost three times more likely to own a business than renters?

Did you know children of homeowners are 116% more likely to graduate from college?

And — here’s a big one — did you know that a homeowner’s net worth is 45.9 times that of a renter’s?

Homeownership is one of the biggest drivers of personal wealth, and the Home At Last program is doing its part to ensure more rural Nevadans have access to affordable homeownership.

Before we dig into HAL’s offerings, let’s define “rural” (because if you’re reading this in Las Vegas, you’re likely thinking, “Why do I care?”). In 2005, Nevada legislation clarified our jurisdiction and defined it as areas with populations under 150,000. Many people are surprised to learn that homes for sale in Enterprise, Mountain’s Edge, Southern Highlands, Whitney, Winchester and Summerlin South are eligible!

The Home At Last program offers customized down payment assistance options (up to $25,000!) for qualifying homebuyers. Program eligibility requirements are an income maximum of $135,000 and a FICO minimum of 640 — and you do not need to be a first-time homebuyer. Down payment assistance is provided in the form of a three-year second mortgage that is completely forgiven after living in the home as a primary residence for the first three years. There is no interest and there are no payments on the down payment assistance provided. A Home At Last approved lender (read on for details about how to connect with one) will pair the assistance with a 30-year first mortgage with a fixed interest rate. And, there are no separate applications to fill out, so it’s easy and doesn’t slow down closing!

Home At Last approved lenders pre-qualify homebuyers for the mortgage loan required to purchase the home. Loan types include FHA, VA, USDA Rural Development, and conventional loans. There are no purchase price limits when buying a home through the Home At Last program, although the loan type may impose a limit. Of course, all loans must meet applicable loan guidelines, but a Home At Last approved lender will explain those details.

Let’s quickly talk about rates: as of this writing, for example, Home At Last offers a 2.625% interest rate with 2% assistance on an FHA loan, and — hold onto your hats — a 2.250% with 0% assistance (among nine other rates, loan types and assistance amounts). That’s right: even if a buyer doesn’t need down payment assistance, they can access that crazy-low rate. Access to affordable credit is the name of our game. Home At Last down payment assistance is the real deal!

Because we’re always trying to find ways to help make homeownership achievable, we’re always innovating. The Mortgage Credit Certificate program (or MCC) helps ensure homeownership remains affordable by providing qualified first-time buyers and qualified veterans with an annual federal income tax credit equal to 30% of the mortgage interest paid — every year for the life of the loan. While a tax credit may not sound like the sexiest thing in the world, the savings sure does. Let’s do some math.

With an MCC, a 30-year loan with a 3.250% interest rate would produce nearly $40,000 in tax savings over the life of the loan. Let’s say that again: Forty. Thousand. Dollars.

The MCC can be paired with Home At Last down payment assistance or used on its own — however, the MCC can only be initiated at the time of purchase, so if you’re interested in seeing if you qualify, be sure to ask your lender at the very start.

MCC. DPA. FHA. DTI. AOK? It’s a bit of an alphabet soup, isn’t it? That’s why we offer homebuyer education. Not only is education a requirement of our program, it’s an awesome way we help our homebuyers be as informed as possible as they venture into one of the biggest, if not the biggest, purchase of their lives.

Home At Last University (HAL U for short) is where our Nevada rural homebuying education happens. It’s online, it’s free and it’s kinda fun (if we do say so ourselves). Homebuyer 101 will give you the deets on our program and insights into the entire homebuying process. Do you know the 3 C’s of credit? How about the difference between an inspection and an appraisal? And what about all that stuff you need to know to be a responsible homeowner for many years to come? We’ve got you covered at HomeAtLastEducation.org.

At the end of your Homebuyer 101 course, you’ll receive two fabulous things: 1) your “diploma,” which is what you’ll need to provide to your lender; and 2) a direct link to our lender search tool. Just like the “Find My Store” tool in your favorite barista app, this tool uses your zip code to find HAL-approved lenders in your area (venti mocha chip frappa-something not included). What is included is a network filled with ah-mazing lending professionals who know our programs inside and out, and can help develop your custom map to affordable homeownership.

If you’re reading this as a loan officer or real estate professional, and you’re not already involved with Home At Last, shoot us a note at HAL@NVRural.org — let’s get you hooked up with HAL!

Is your brain full yet? Hungry for more?

Details about Nevada Rural Housing programs can be found at NVRural.org. It is our duty and honor to serve thousands of rural Nevadans, and satisfy that ache for home.

Coleman is Communications Director for the Nevada Rural Housing Authority.

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Kelvin Watson named executive director of Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Date posted:

Kelvin Watson named executive director of Las Vegas-Clark County Library District

Kelvin Watson

Kelvin Watson has been named the new executive director of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District, effective Feb. 16. Watson joins the Library District from his role as the director of the Broward County Libraries Division, where he manages over 700 full-time employees and a budget of over $70 million. The Broward County library system serves 1.9 million people through 38 locations in the Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. region.

“Kelvin Watson is one of the most highly respected thought leaders in the library industry, and we are extremely proud to welcome him as our new executive director,” said Felipe Ortiz, chair of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District Board of Trustees. “We are confident that his fund-raising skills, deep expertise in technology, and demonstrated success in addressing the digital divide will help us to expand access to our free educational services and create new, innovative programing for all residents.

Watson is credited with expanding his customer base in past library management roles, through outreach efforts to underserved and diverse populations.

“During this challenging time for our economy, the free resources offered by our community libraries have become more important than ever,” said Watson. “Libraries are here to help children and adults pursue their dreams and build better lives through skills development, education and digital access, and exposure to the arts and culture. I am grateful to the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District for this opportunity to positively impact the lives of our local individuals and families and I look forward to working with local leaders and stakeholders to build on the great work already being done.”

Watson has received numerous awards for his leadership within the library industry, including: the 2016 inaugural winner of the American Library Association’s Ernest A. DiMattia Award for Innovation and Service to Community and Profession; the 2017 DEMCO/ALA Black Caucus Award for Excellence in Librarianship; and as the 2019 Community Service & Distinguished Achievement Honoree by the Friends of the African American Research Library and Culture Center.

Watson earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and a Minor in Military Science from Lincoln University in Missouri. He earned his Masters of Library Science Degree from North Carolina Central University. He is also a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity.

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HEALTH IS THE NEW HAPPY! Life is but a dream

Date posted:

Life is but a dream

BY TIFFANY McNEELY

Tiffany McNeely

“Life is but a dream.” This catchphrase has so much meaning to me now that I am older.

Do you ever notice that life goes by so fast? You have goals and plans in life and notice that your nights are filled with dreams about these goals and plans. Do you ever wonder what these dreams mean and how they can help to better your life? Do you ever wonder how you can use them to become a better version of yourself?

I’ve always been a dreamer at night. I realized that so many things that I would dream would come true in my real life — maybe a different person involved or a little bit different scenario, but for the most part everything seems to come to life.

What if you could dream your life true? What if we already are dreaming it and it’s just not to the fullest potential yet? I had the opportunity to meet Jen The Rainmaker, founder of DreamYOU University, and see some of her videos online. It was at that moment I realized that I may need more insight to navigate in my dream life — and learn how to be more conscious or awake.

I’ve had many lucid dreams — meaning they felt very real. Some may be positive, but others were scary to the point where my mind would tell me to wake up. I would try to pull out of the dream, but it was so heavy it would pull me back in — and I couldn’t wake up.

If you’re like me — either a dreamer or curious about how your dream life can change your real life — I would definitely recommend getting in touch with Jen The Rainmaker at DreamYOU University. Jen is a descendant of Chichimeca Dream Warriors who believed that our dreams create our reality. In DreamYOU, she teaches how to program our dreams to consciously create the reality we desire — using practices that were passed down for thousands of years through her ancestors’ oral tradition. This is also a way to reprogram your subconscious while you sleep.

Over the years, her school has grown by word-of-mouth from her Dream Planting 101 students —who have referred their families, friends, and even clients. Her students often say Dream Planting Works. So far my experience with the meditation and other practices she teaches has helped ease my anxiety and allowed me to feel more free and awake to my reality.

I do believe anyone — no matter their walk of faith — can benefit from learning from Jen The Rainmaker. May the peace be with you all.

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Cox Communications honors community leaders

Date posted:

Cox Communications honors community leaders

Cox Communications is celebrating Black History Month by honoring four Southern Nevadans who each have a long history of making a difference in our community.

Honorees include Nevada Assemblywoman Daniele Monroe-Moreno; 100 Black Men of America Las Vegas Chapter Founder Larry Mosley; Director of the Oral History Research Center at UNLV Libraries Claytee White; and Cox Media Consultant and Chair of Cox’s Southwest Region Diversity & Inclusion Council Keith Wingate.

“Cox is a company that celebrates inclusion and diversity in our workforce, supplier chain and in our communities,” said Cox VP and Market Leader Michael F. Bolognini. “We’re proud to recognize these individuals, each of whom has made an impact in Southern Nevada over many years.”

Cox has donated $1,000 each to 100 Black Men of Las Vegas, CASA Foundation of Las Vegas, Three Square and the Sawubona Foundation through Nevada Community Foundation in recognition of these honorees. PSAs featuring each will run on Cox channels through February and honorees will be featured on “Doing More” on Cox’s YurView Channel 14/1014.

Las Vegas Black Image Magazine also celebrates the Cox honorees and had the opportunity to conduct interviews with Mosley, White, and Wingate.

Larry Mosley, 100 Black Men of America Las Vegas Chapter Founder and President

LARRY MOSLEY

As the founder and president of the 100 Black Men Las Vegas Chapter, where do you see the organization doing its best work?

The organization is a mentoring organization. There are 101 chapters throughout the United States. I have been a member of four different chapters. I am one of the founding members of the Sacramento and Baltimore chapters. When I came to Las Vegas almost 21 years ago, there was not a chapter here and I personally had been involved with the 100 Black Men national organization for 36 years.

We are a mentoring organization working with young people—and that is our passion and our purpose. We give a lot of scholarships and recently teamed up with Nevada State College with a health and wellness program and we have a collegiate program. I came back to Las Vegas three years ago and I serve for the fourth and final time as the president of the Las Vegas chapter of the 100 Black Men Organization. Within my succession plan, I am happy and proud the Mr. Gentry Richardson has stepped up to the plate and is now the president of the Las Vegas chapter.

Previously, you served as Director of Nevada’s Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation. Now, with COVID-19 and so many out of work, what’s your advice to people who are trying to financially hold on by a thread?

I would say to stay diligent — first and foremost. I am really impressed with President Biden and the work he is doing. The Department of Labor is the organization I worked closely with, and I know DETR has a lot of challenges because I was at the helm during the housing crisis. I know getting through the phone lines for the unemployment office is difficult, but you can’t give up. I would also advise people to look at contacting other organizations with support programs to help people during this tough time.

Do you agree that job training is necessary in the changing workforce environment?

Absolutely, that was one of the things Bob Bailey and I really worked passionately toward. As it relates to training you have to be prepared for an opportunity. I used to tell students when I taught at San Jose State: “Better to be prepared for an opportunity and not have it than to have an opportunity and not be prepared for it.”

Why is it so important for our youth to see African-American males in professional positions such as teachers, doctors and CEOs?

It is very impactful. What we say nationally is, “What they see is what they will be.” When you see brothers in the 100 Black Men Organization with their suits on — it’s about what our children see. When children look at our organization, they see doctors, lawyers, policemen, business professionals, and governmental officials. We teach our youth to dream.

How do you feel about your recent Cox Communication’s Honor?

I am just delighted and so humbled by the honor. I am thankful and appreciative of the Cox Communication salute.

CLAYTEE WHITE

Claytee White, Director of the Oral History Research Center

Tell us about your position at UNLV and gathering oral history for its library.

This has been an amazing journey and nothing was planned. It was like an open book and it allowed me and UNLV to do some amazing work in the community. We started by interviewing people in the African-American community — that started before there was such a thing called “Oral History Research Center.” Later on, I was a student back in the day getting my master’s degree at UNLV and someone said, “Let’s do an oral history project.” The UNLV history department trained us and we did this project.

Students were assigned topics such as: historic women in Las Vegas, entertainment in Las Vegas, and gaming in Las Vegas. I saw that the topics had all been taken and wondered what I could research. Someone said in the room, “There is a Black community in Las Vegas” — and that time I had only been living in Vegas for a couple of years and I had no idea where the Black community was. At that time, I would go to the local beautician every other week in Vegas because I had a perm on my hair. I asked the beautician, “Where is the Black community?” She pointed at a lady in the waiting area and said, “You need to speak to that lady who is getting in the chair next.”

That lady was Connie Gaye, the daughter of Jimmy and Hazel Gaye. And that started it all. Jimmy and Hazel Gaye gave me an interview and introduced me to some people from Tallulah, Louisiana and we got started. Then someone told me about the Moulin Rouge Hotel — the first integrated hotel and casino in the country; and I started interviewing a woman who was a dancer at the Moulin Rouge Hotel. She told me all about the Moulin Rouge and told me about the wonderful people surrounding the Moulin Rouge.

I collected as many of those interviews as I possibly could — and that woman was Anna Bailey. She then introduced me to Alice Key and all kinds of other people in the Black Las Vegas community. I started learning Las Vegas history and about the Black community. The most fabulous thing about the history is that the more I learned, the more people invited me around the city of Vegas to speak about my historic findings.

Why is it so important to know Black history?

It is very important to know our history because nobody can turn us around. We know about Jim Crow, The Civil Rights Movement and the N.A.A.C.P. that was started in 1909. The more we know, the more armor we have to tell our stories. We don’t have to make up anything. Black people have a great history and we can pass it down to our children. The history becomes more and more vibrant and more important every day.

How many years have you been doing this now?

The UNLV Oral History Research Center started in 2003. But, the early interviews I did in the Las Vegas Black community started in the 1990s. So we go back that far — everything from 2003 to 2016 has been digitized.

Do you find that Black people have benefited more from conflict resolution or advocacy?

I think it is advocacy. Especially here in the Las Vegas Black community. Starting back in the early 1930s. Those activists were just available and were at the right place at the right time. They started organizations in 1932. There was a Democratic club and a Republican club in the Black community. People wanted to know about voting. They wanted to know about history and they started organizations early. When Black people weren’t hired at first on the Hoover Dam construction, they got together and got in touch with the N.A.A.C.P. in the regional office. Local Black residents had them come to Las Vegas to advocate for them. So you had those activists in the community that passed down activism from generation to generation.

How do you feel about your Cox Communications Honor for Black History Month?

I want to thank Cox Communications so much for this great honor.

Keith Wingate, Cox Media Consultant and Chair of Cox’s Southwest Region Diversity & Inclusion Council

KEITH WINGATE

Tell us about your position as Cox Media Consultant and Chair of Cox’s Southwest Region Diversity & Inclusion Council?

My main job is as a media consultant. This means I am a marketer for radio, television and cable services for small and medium size businesses. I have been doing that for about 32 years. In addition to that, for the last four years I have been involved in leadership of the Cox Southwest Region Diversity & Inclusion Council. I was enlightened because it has given me an opportunity to really work with the leadership, as well as facilitate an environment with a strong culture of inclusiveness and equity.

Do you think that the images of African-Americans the media today are helping or hurting Black communities?

That’s a good question. I think we are moving media. The past media had been stagnant when it came to Black people. Especially the displayed image of Black males. I see that moving and the movement happening is giving highlights of Black men and Black women. We are familiar with the Black girls movement over the past couple of years. I think we see a similar movement with Black men also happening. We are getting our place at the table and we’re really making an impact in our communities.

Is there something that Cox Communications is doing to really bridge some of the divides that are going on today?

Yes, our company has pledged dollars toward social justice initiatives across the country. The good thing I like about the company is that they didn’t just take this task on themselves. They asked Cox employees, “What initiatives should we as a company do?” “What organizations should we be a part of?” “What policies do you think we should support in order to support you being an employee here making not only our work environment more sustainable, but also making our communities more impactful?” So the company has done that across the country as well as having a local footprint here in Las Vegas. So, we are very excited about the commitment to diversity and inclusion in our communities.

Are there any programs offered by Cox Communications that help bridge the digital divide?

Yes, our “Connect 2 Compete Program” is a program where a student that qualifies for the free lunch program can fill out an application and actually qualify for reduced priced internet service. So they can be connected for their school work. We have provided this avenue for people in marginalized communities, so they can have some type of equity and be able to really be on par with their peers.

Given the COVID crisis, does Cox Communications offer any special marketing tools for minority owned businesses so they can stay competitive?

Great question. I think the first message I should extend is that I hope everyone is being safe and wearing a mask. I know it’s not fashionably acceptable, but it is necessary and will make it so that we all sustain. We at Cox Communications have a plethora of assets that are available for small business owners. Some of these include on our Cox cable systems that offer advertising opportunities on national networks such as BET, TV-One, VH1, CNN, or MSNBC — we help design strategic initiatives targeting your marketing demographics. Based on behaviors of the consumers who buy from you, we will target your consumers based on behaviors to deliver your business message. Developing campaigns for television, IPhones, or tablets — we have ways to actually deliver your qualified messages to the people who buy from your business.

How did you respond when you heard Cox Communications was honoring you?

I was very surprised because I just go to work every day and try to do my part. To be tapped on the shoulder and to be recognized by your peers in leadership speaks volumes. I am overwhelmed and very humbled by the honor.

_________________________________CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO WATCH_______________________________________

Here is the YouTube version of the full special: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMUdXwxH_Qk

And here is the story with the special as well as the individual stories clipped: https://www.ktnv.com/lifestyle/black-history-month/13-action-news-and-black-image-magazine-honors-community-members-helping-others

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